Tenet - Box Office Autopsy

An original action espionage film releasing in IMAX on August 12, 2020
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Cinemas in Germany are closed again. Even though there were no cinema related covid incidents. Ridiculous! :facepalm: Tenets cinema run here is most likely over. So...

Total gross: $19.3M
Visitors:1.639.431
Second most visited film of the year and financially the most successfull.

For comparison
Dunkirk: $7.7M - 749.639 visitors
Interstellar:$19.9M - 1.704.389 visitors

Better than Dunkirk and on the same level as Interstellar. Even though the seat capacity was limited to 50% per screen. Great Success! (in Borat voice)

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X-MementoMori-X wrote:
November 3rd, 2020, 7:14 am
Cinemas in Germany are closed again. Even though there were no cinema related covid incidents. Ridiculous! :facepalm: Tenets cinema run here is most likely over. So...

Total gross: $19.3M
Visitors:1.639.431
Second most visited film of the year and financially the most successfull.

For comparison
Dunkirk: $7.7M - 749.639 visitors
Interstellar:$19.9M - 1.704.389 visitors

Better than Dunkirk and on the same level as Interstellar. Even though the seat capacity was limited to 50% per screen. Great Success! (in Borat voice)
:gonf:

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Ace
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Why Christopher Nolan gave in and helped a critic interpret his movies
...It is, though, an argument for taking movies seriously. And it’s out in a moment when the film business is facing existential challenges because of COVID-19. How do you see the outlook for movies?

Nolan: Well, it’s a difficult question to speak to. If you’re talking about the acceleration of existing trends, that’s something I started reading right at the beginning of the pandemic. And it ignores the reality that 2019 was the biggest year for theatrical films in history. They’d made the most money. The admissions were huge. So to me, it’s much more about: What’s the new reality we’re living in?

Warner Bros. released “Tenet,” and I’m thrilled that it has made almost $350 million. But I am worried that the studios are drawing the wrong conclusions from our release — that rather than looking at where the film has worked well and how that can provide them with much needed revenue, they’re looking at where it hasn’t lived up to pre-COVID expectations and will start using that as an excuse to make exhibition take all the losses from the pandemic instead of getting in the game and adapting — or rebuilding our business, in other words.

Long term, moviegoing is a part of life, like restaurants and everything else. But right now, everybody has to adapt to a new reality.

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Ace wrote:
November 3rd, 2020, 1:15 pm
Why Christopher Nolan gave in and helped a critic interpret his movies
...It is, though, an argument for taking movies seriously. And it’s out in a moment when the film business is facing existential challenges because of COVID-19. How do you see the outlook for movies?

Nolan: Well, it’s a difficult question to speak to. If you’re talking about the acceleration of existing trends, that’s something I started reading right at the beginning of the pandemic. And it ignores the reality that 2019 was the biggest year for theatrical films in history. They’d made the most money. The admissions were huge. So to me, it’s much more about: What’s the new reality we’re living in?

Warner Bros. released “Tenet,” and I’m thrilled that it has made almost $350 million. But I am worried that the studios are drawing the wrong conclusions from our release — that rather than looking at where the film has worked well and how that can provide them with much needed revenue, they’re looking at where it hasn’t lived up to pre-COVID expectations and will start using that as an excuse to make exhibition take all the losses from the pandemic instead of getting in the game and adapting — or rebuilding our business, in other words.

Long term, moviegoing is a part of life, like restaurants and everything else. But right now, everybody has to adapt to a new reality.
Brilliant response by a brilliant man

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Oh nice, did any of you know about this book on Nolan they're referring to? Will definitely put that on my Christmas list. Here's the description:
An in-depth look at, and written in collaboration with, the man considered to be the most profound, and commercially successful director at work today--his work, including his latest blockbuster, the action-thriller/spy-fi Tenet ("Big, brashly beautiful, grandiosely enjoyable"--Variety); his influences, his vision, his enigmatic childhood past, and much more. With Nolan's never-before-seen photographs, storyboards, and scene sketches.

"The Nolan Variations is that rare thing, a superb book about a living filmmaker. Erudite, complex, labyrinthine and mind-expanding--it's as close as you're ever going to get to the Escher drawing that is Christopher Nolan's remarkable brain."--Sam Mendes

"Fabulous: intelligent, illuminating, rigorous, and highly readable. The very model of what a filmmaking study should be. Essential reading for anyone who cares about Nolan or about film for that matter."--Neal Gabler, author of An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood and Walt Disney, The Biography

A rare, intimate portrait of Christopher Nolan with the full cooperation of Nolan himself who opened up more fully than ever before in his talks with Tom Shone. In chapters structured by themes and motifs ("Time"; "Chaos"), Shone writes of Nolan's thoughts on movies, on plots; on time, identity, perception, chaos, daydreams.

Here is Nolan on the evolution of his pictures, and the writers, artists, directors, and thinkers who have inspired and informed his films.

To write the book, Tom Shone, who has known Nolan for more than two decades and who spent months with the director, was given unprecedented access to Nolan's notes, scripts, storyboards, and artwork.

In this riveting portrait of an artist, Shone deftly navigates Nolan's themes, influences, and working methods (both in writing and directing). Here is his trans-Atlantic childhood ("It makes you feel very differently about the concept of 'home'") . . . how he dreamed up the plot of Inception lying awake one night in his dorm ("I prized the imaginative space of listening to music in the dark, thinking about things, imagining things, films, stories") . . . his color-blindness and its effect on Memento ("People are fascinated by other people's perception of the world and the way in which it differs") . . . his obsession with puzzles and optical illusions . . . and much, much more.
https://www.amazon.com/Nolan-Variations ... 0525655328

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