What is your interpretation of the ending? SPOILERS AHEAD

Christopher Nolan's 2014 grand scale science-fiction story about time and space, and the things that transcend them.
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I'm a John G wrote:
Aili wrote:
Sky007 wrote:Okay let's get talking!
Thoughts on the final moments with Cooper leaving to find Brand on the planet?
For that bit, Brand seemed to be on Edwards, and it looked livable, there were houses around and she seemed to be tending a grave (of her dead lover?)
I thought it was obvious when Coop leaves Brand to go in the black hole and they look back at each other, they both sort of suddenly realize they love each other but were too professional and too uptight to ever admit it.

How Old Murph KNEW Brand was still out there and alone (or mostly alone), I don't know!
oh wait! i have another question regarding this. don't care that i double posted.
why hasn't Brand aged more on Edmunds' planet?? we know Coop hasn't aged because he was trapped in the tesseract, and while he was there + doing the mission Earth essentially aged like 90 years. but a significant portion of those 90 years must have been when he was in the tesseract, so why hasn't Brand aged on the planet? he doesn't reach her until at least 40+ years of Earth time passing since falling into the tesseract, since Murph is so old when he's spit out. she figures out the equation, the tesseract closes, Coop is spit out, and they find him when Murph is on her deathbed....

...so then how is Brand still young, sexy Anne Hathaway at the end? wouldn't she be closer to Murphs age?

unless, of course, that last shot of Brand wasn't meant to be a 'present' shot, and she actually did age and we just didn't see it...
Coop got spit out hours after he entered the black hole. Remember the doctor telling him that he was lucky they found him when he did because he only had a few minutes left of oxygen. So Coop returned only hours after he left Brand. I think the 90 earth years passing happened when they were trying to sling shot the black hole. Brand probably did age more than Coop did but not by much.

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joker94 wrote:Was an awesome experience to see this in 70 mm IMAX :) .. Can't wait to see it again!
The end kind of reminded me of 2001 in certain ways.

The black hole is Interstellar's version of the monolith. Something beyond human understanding. When Cooper goes across the horizon, he is brought to a place where he travels in time. When his task in there is done, mankind is ready to take the next big evolutionary step - to leave their home planet.

I think Cooper's experiences inside the black hole cannot be explained fully by what we are shown in the movie. Love (the quantifiable fifth dimension that connects people across space and time) plays a role . Gravity plays a role. "They" play a role. Its probably meant to be abstract at some level. Instead of a single explanation, it becomes what each person feels it should be.

Can't wait for that second viewing :)
And this is what I love about there being a certain ambiguity that lends to infinite interpretations. It's what made Inception so beautiful but even more so here.

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The ending... I just took it as what it is. If you asked me if i liked it or not; i do not know.

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Hustler wrote:
If there are truly evolved humans in the future living in a 5th dimensional universe, then the species has already survived and evolved, so why the need to communicate with past humans to ensure survival that already happens? And no, that thought doesn't ruin anything about the movie for me, I absolutely love it. It's amazing that it can be this thought-provoking. But it kind of reminds of Ebert's question regarding Memento, about how does Leonard recognize he has a condition (though actual cases of people with short-term memory loss realizing they have a condition can be cited).
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I think NASA in some other timeline/dimension was able to successfully complete Plan B leaving the people on earth to die. They were going through with that mission with or without Coop as Professor Brand explained. That alternate reality was able to live and evolve into the evolved future humans who devised a way to change the past and save the people of earth.

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JL Unlimited wrote:
Hustler wrote:
If there are truly evolved humans in the future living in a 5th dimensional universe, then the species has already survived and evolved, so why the need to communicate with past humans to ensure survival that already happens? And no, that thought doesn't ruin anything about the movie for me, I absolutely love it. It's amazing that it can be this thought-provoking. But it kind of reminds of Ebert's question regarding Memento, about how does Leonard recognize he has a condition (though actual cases of people with short-term memory loss realizing they have a condition can be cited).
I think NASA in some other timeline/dimension was able to successfully complete Plan B leaving the people on earth to die. They were going through with that mission with or without Coop as Professor Brand explained. That alternate reality was able to live and evolve into the evolved future humans who devised a way to change the past and save the people of earth.
Now that's an explanation I can buy into. Thank you, that will enhance future viewings.

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Vesh wrote:
Sky007 wrote:This seems to be the popular discussion page so I'll ask it here. In Inception all of the characters can be seen as a Jungian archetypes found in dreams or a specific part of a filmmaking team. Has anyone made any similar connections to these characters? Perhaps different parts of human nature?
Damon's character sparked my interest with this. He seems to be some sort of parallel to Cooper.
I know there are more than a few people and critics who thought Damon's part was unnecessary, but I found his character really important during my viewing experience. His character is a classic foil to Cooper's: a man without a family who is driven to insanity by the fear of failure and the singular determination to complete the "mission" and extend humanity. Coop, at this point in the story, wants nothing more than to return to his loved ones despite having no way to save them anymore. Plan B is more of a chore, an obstacle, than a necessity to him.

During, and after, the sequence with Dr. Mann, I really began to appreciate what Cooper's motivation was. Damon's character exhibits an apparent evil, but it is more that his goals are in service of a survivalist mentality, one that is not hindered by the weight of loved ones. He has been stranded on that failure of a planet for years, with nothing but time to think. Although it is easy to dismiss him as a crazed villain, I would be willing to bet there are many people who would react in a similar matter. He didn't fall victim to the dark side, he was exhibiting a part of humanity that many of us have. Coop, on the other hand, wouldn't even be on this mission if it weren't for Plan A, and the contrast between him and Dr. Mann really puts that into perspective. His relationship with his family, especially Murph, is the part of humanity that drives his decision-making. This disparity between their characters also highlights why Coop is ultimately the "chosen" hero to communicate back to Murph. His love is what makes the resolution at the conclusion of the film possible, a feat that someone like Dr. Mann would never be able to perform. Considering Nolan's background in classical literature and penchant inclination for using character foils, I thought this one was well done.

Also his death set us up for one of the most spectacular, cinematic set pieces this side of Inception's rotating hallway
Damon was marvelous.

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Hustler wrote:
Now that's an explanation I can buy into. Thank you, that will enhance future viewings.
No worries! :twothumbsup:

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the scene between Mann and coop reminds me of an antic tragedy. Especially mann's lines. He knows his weakness, but he can't avoid his fate. Like every human being he is meant to be asshole at some point.

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There are underlying themes about human nature in general throughout the movie.
Tom couldn't get over his past and kept staying in the same house at the cost of his wife and kid's health. Whereas Murph used the same thing as a sort of motivation to keep moving forward and ended up working for NASA to solve the equation. It's reflective of how people react to difficult situations in real life. How some folks cannot get over it and how others use it to become a better person.

Dr. Mann is a classic example of the dark side of human nature. Anne's character at one point says that nature is dangerous and scary, but not evil. And as we see later on, the evil appears in the form of Dr. Mann - a human.

And regarding some discussion on why Anne hadn't aged in the last shot, I though it was because the planet was close to the black hole and as a result time there is much slower than time on earth? (similar to the time dilation they experience on the water planet).

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Another question:
How does Murph solve the gravity problem if Dr. Mann said Brand had already solved it before the Lazarus mission had even left? What exactly did Murph solve?

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