Christian Bale as Bruce Wayne/Batman

The 2012 superhero epic about Batman's struggle to overcome the terrorist leader Bane, as well as his own inner demons.
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That's so nice of Bale, can't help but feel sorry for the kid though. :cry:
ryan4butler wrote:Image
He looks like a mannequin there.

stanley wrote:
darthnazgul wrote:Eh, just felt it would've made the moment all the more personal. I don't have anything wrong with the scene itself, I'm just Saiyan.
I dont know about that scene, but I've always felt that Bale should have used his 'regular' voice when talking to people who know he's Batman , aka Rachel Dawes , Alfred, Selina Kyle, etc...

It just makes more sense, and I think it would give more weight to those emotional moments.
I always adopted the thought of "You never know who's listening" for those scenes.
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darthnazgul wrote:That's so nice of Bale, can't help but feel sorry for the kid though. :cry:
ryan4butler wrote:Image
He looks like a mannequin there.

stanley wrote:
I dont know about that scene, but I've always felt that Bale should have used his 'regular' voice when talking to people who know he's Batman , aka Rachel Dawes , Alfred, Selina Kyle, etc...

It just makes more sense, and I think it would give more weight to those emotional moments.
I always adopted the thought of "You never know who's listening" for those scenes.
It's that and I think Nolan (or someone) thought at some moment that shifting between voices would have a jarring and confusing effect on viewer's attention. So they've made the decision to prevent that and thus add to Bruce's sense of unconditionality about certain things and Batman's more consistent beasty nature. It doesn't even really sacrifice logic because in the relatively realistic Nolan's Gotham it makes some sense that whoever's dedicated (or crazy) enough to go through all this could possibly want to keep the voice consistent as well. So the movie doesn't address Bruce's choice to do that, it only presents the result. It all inevitably ends up being something very easy to make fun of without accounting for everything above. The hilarity factor ofc being amplified by the realism of most of the movie.

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prince0gotham wrote:
darthnazgul wrote:That's so nice of Bale, can't help but feel sorry for the kid though. :cry:


He looks like a mannequin there.



I always adopted the thought of "You never know who's listening" for those scenes.
It's that and I think Nolan (or someone) thought at some moment that shifting between voices would have a jarring and confusing effect on viewer's attention. So they've made the decision to prevent that and thus add to Bruce's sense of unconditionality about certain things and Batman's more consistent beasty nature. It doesn't even really sacrifice logic because in the relatively realistic Nolan's Gotham it makes some sense that whoever's dedicated (or crazy) enough to go through all this could possibly want to keep the voice consistent as well. So the movie doesn't address Bruce's choice to do that, it only presents the result. It all inevitably ends up being something very easy to make fun of without accounting for everything above. The hilarity factor ofc being amplified by the realism of most of the movie.
My thoughts exactly. When Bruce puts on the cape and the cowl, he's no long Bruce Wayne, he's Batman, the beast. He no longer speaks in his Wayne voice, he growls. It doesn't matter who he's talking to, when he's wearing the suit, he's Batman.

People tend to ignore the psychopathic aspect of Batman. To quote Bruce Wayne from Begins: "Guy dresses up like a bat, clearly got issues."

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Celestin wrote:
prince0gotham wrote: It's that and I think Nolan (or someone) thought at some moment that shifting between voices would have a jarring and confusing effect on viewer's attention. So they've made the decision to prevent that and thus add to Bruce's sense of unconditionality about certain things and Batman's more consistent beasty nature. It doesn't even really sacrifice logic because in the relatively realistic Nolan's Gotham it makes some sense that whoever's dedicated (or crazy) enough to go through all this could possibly want to keep the voice consistent as well. So the movie doesn't address Bruce's choice to do that, it only presents the result. It all inevitably ends up being something very easy to make fun of without accounting for everything above. The hilarity factor ofc being amplified by the realism of most of the movie.
My thoughts exactly. When Bruce puts on the cape and the cowl, he's no long Bruce Wayne, he's Batman, the beast. He no longer speaks in his Wayne voice, he growls. It doesn't matter who he's talking to, when he's wearing the suit, he's Batman.

People tend to ignore the psychopathic aspect of Batman. To quote Bruce Wayne from Begins: "Guy dresses up like a bat, clearly got issues."
Yeah, I mean he got initiated in a secret ancient order with a very strongly established set of ways where image and presentation along with infinite persistance and dedication is everything. Combine that with the whole motivational spectrum from his childhood and you'll clearly get someone willing enough to not compromise the image in any way, unless it HAS to be compromised (when compromise aligns with the underlying purpose of that image).

So you got all those who complain how something isn't realistic, but that certain something has a realism of its own. A causality realism. You can only blame the movie for not spelling it out, why he made the choice of never shifting, but in a way - it's right there.

EDIT: I should add that it also enriches the perspective towards Bruce as a child that never grew up (never recovered from tragedy and never rose above obsession) that still plays with toys, assumes the role of an idealistic superhero that battles evil and accomplishes ultimate good. If you think about it the child syndrome is pretty strongly intertwined within the thematical fabric of the trilogy. Every time something truly shit happens and every time he doesn't know what to do there's a throwback to that scene in Begins where he felt guilty for his parents' death and there's always Alfred to tell him 'No, you're wrong'.

So in an even deeper, psychological way, the voice makes complete sense.

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prince0gotham wrote:
Celestin wrote:
My thoughts exactly. When Bruce puts on the cape and the cowl, he's no long Bruce Wayne, he's Batman, the beast. He no longer speaks in his Wayne voice, he growls. It doesn't matter who he's talking to, when he's wearing the suit, he's Batman.

People tend to ignore the psychopathic aspect of Batman. To quote Bruce Wayne from Begins: "Guy dresses up like a bat, clearly got issues."
Yeah, I mean he got initiated in a secret ancient order with a very strongly established set of ways where image and presentation along with infinite persistance and dedication is everything. Combine that with the whole motivational spectrum from his childhood and you'll clearly get someone willing enough to not compromise the image in any way, unless it HAS to be compromised (when compromise aligns with the underlying purpose of that image).

So you got all those who complain how something isn't realistic, but that certain something has a realism of its own. A causality realism. You can only blame the movie for not spelling it out, why he made the choice of never shifting, but in a way - it's right there.

EDIT: I should add that it also enriches the perspective towards Bruce as a child that never grew up (never recovered from tragedy and never rose above obsession) that still plays with toys, assumes the role of an idealistic superhero that battles evil and accomplishes ultimate good. If you think about it the child syndrome is pretty strongly intertwined within the thematical fabric of the trilogy. Every time something truly shit happens and every time he doesn't know what to do there's a throwback to that scene in Begins where he felt guilty for his parents' death and there's always Alfred to tell him 'No, you're wrong'.

So in an even deeper, psychological way, the voice makes complete sense.



Yep! :thumbup:

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One thought I had about the relationship between Batman and Gordon which I didn't quite realise until now that is actually pretty brilliant.

Before Rises came out, there was a bit of talk about how they'd do the "I never said thank you" exchange this time around, maybe even having the roles switched. Well,
in a way it was there. When Batman says "Anyone can be a hero" and reveals his identity to Gordon, he remembers when he comforted young Bruce as he was a child.

In Begins, Gordon is only there for a moment and not once does Bruce say thank you, he is still traumatised after all. In fact he doesn't say a word, yet Gordon comforts him nonetheless. So when Bruce, as an adult just about to sacrifice himself to save the city, he explains how anyone can be a hero. Right there he showed his gratitude thirty years late, yet he still never said thank you. Because he'd never have to.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I've got something in my eye. :cry:
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darthnazgul wrote:One thought I had about the relationship between Batman and Gordon which I didn't quite realise until now that is actually pretty brilliant.

Before Rises came out, there was a bit of talk about how they'd do the "I never said thank you" exchange this time around, maybe even having the roles switched. Well,
in a way it was there. When Batman says "Anyone can be a hero" and reveals his identity to Gordon, he remembers when he comforted young Bruce as he was a child.

In Begins, Gordon is only there for a moment and not once does Bruce say thank you, he is still traumatised after all. In fact he doesn't say a word, yet Gordon comforts him nonetheless. So when Bruce, as an adult just about to sacrifice himself to save the city, he explains how anyone can be a hero. Right there he showed his gratitude thirty years late, yet he still never said thank you. Because he'd never have to.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I've got something in my eye. :cry:
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Sigs???

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TehBatGetsBraked wrote:
darthnazgul wrote:One thought I had about the relationship between Batman and Gordon which I didn't quite realise until now that is actually pretty brilliant.

Before Rises came out, there was a bit of talk about how they'd do the "I never said thank you" exchange this time around, maybe even having the roles switched. Well,
in a way it was there. When Batman says "Anyone can be a hero" and reveals his identity to Gordon, he remembers when he comforted young Bruce as he was a child.

In Begins, Gordon is only there for a moment and not once does Bruce say thank you, he is still traumatised after all. In fact he doesn't say a word, yet Gordon comforts him nonetheless. So when Bruce, as an adult just about to sacrifice himself to save the city, he explains how anyone can be a hero. Right there he showed his gratitude thirty years late, yet he still never said thank you. Because he'd never have to.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I've got something in my eye. :cry:
MIND




BLOWN


FUCK


CUNT


OMG


SRSLY


FUCK
Am I the only one that noticed how Braked is more open to swear words than he was last year?

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07202012 wrote:
TehBatGetsBraked wrote:
MIND




BLOWN


FUCK


CUNT


OMG


SRSLY


FUCK
Am I the only one that noticed how Braked is more open to swear words than he was last year?
I think he has severe tourettes.

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