Photos from my New Film (coming soon)

For those that have dreams of making films!

Moderator: Erik

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Thanks everyone.



And the camera is a canon t2i rebel of course.

Posts: 244
Joined: August 2009
I just finished my first cut of the film. I'll post it online eventually put I'm gonna wait to hear feedback from my class first till I make changes then do that. I thought it turned out alright though.

Posts: 244
Joined: August 2009
Okay I finished the film.

Watch it Here: http://youtu.be/Sh1-E2I0mWc?hd=1



For HD, watch in either 720p or 1080p (may take a while to buffer on most computers)

Keep in mind, this was a "One Scene" assignment. Its not a full movie. It definitely belongs in a bigger story, I'm hoping it could be the genesis for a longer movie about two women who become vigilantes and how the sins of the father have been passed down to the children. You won't get all that out of this one scene, but hopefully you enjoy the short story of revenge and the dualism of the two siblings.

I had a couple of people in my class who really didn't like it and made sure to be vocal about it, including the head of the film department who rathers we make personal films rather than genre movies. But I think if people knew more of the backstory to the film they'd maybe enjoy it a little better so if you guys have any questions I'm more than willing to answer them.

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Brendan M. wrote:And... Has this ever happened to any of you guys while filming?

http://vimeo.com/21915943
Why was he so far back? I thought one of the major purposes of the slate was so it could be close enough to the camera so that you could see the scene number and take number for the editor to use later on?

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sanford wrote:
Brendan M. wrote:And... Has this ever happened to any of you guys while filming?

http://vimeo.com/21915943
Why was he so far back? I thought one of the major purposes of the slate was so it could be close enough to the camera so that you could see the scene number and take number for the editor to use later on?
Hey dude, thanks for watching the clip and thanks for the tip, but I'd prefer to answer questions in regards to the actual movie instead, thanks.

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Brendan M. wrote:
sanford wrote:
Why was he so far back? I thought one of the major purposes of the slate was so it could be close enough to the camera so that you could see the scene number and take number for the editor to use later on?
Hey dude, thanks for watching the clip and thanks for the tip, but I'd prefer to answer questions in regards to the actual movie instead, thanks.
But it was you who asked? :)

Anyway, about the scene:
Great scene! The shots look great and the dialogue is good. Did you use any extra light on the set, or just stick to the lights from the ceiling?

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Jonas Agersø wrote:
Brendan M. wrote:
Hey dude, thanks for watching the clip and thanks for the tip, but I'd prefer to answer questions in regards to the actual movie instead, thanks.
But it was you who asked? :)

Anyway, about the scene:
Great scene! The shots look great and the dialogue is good. Did you use any extra light on the set, or just stick to the lights from the ceiling?
lol, oops. I guess I came off as a rude mother fucker with the last post. I had just posted the movie and wanted to discuss that instead of how I was being a dumb ass by holding my slate too far from the camera. Sorry bout that.


Yeah, I didn't use any lighting outside of what was available in the parking garage.

Glad you liked the dialogue. That was the part of the film my professors were most critical of me for.

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Great scene, well shot, well acted.
We don't need more of the story, this could easily be the movie. Everything that you really have to know is told, what you don't have to know, we can make up ourselves. :thumbup:

Some people in your class do not know what the hell they're talking about!
David emerges from the store slowly. He braces himself against a parked car and then keeps on walking in a nightmarish daze.

WE PULL BACK as David blends in with dozens and dozens of ordinary people, walking on an ordinary street, in an ordinary city.

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Brendan M. wrote: Yeah, I didn't use any lighting outside of what was available in the parking garage.
Well it worked very well.
Glad you liked the dialogue. That was the part of the film my professors were most critical of me for.
Hmm, I thought it was very natural and greatly executed. Too make dialogue seem natural is an art just by it self. Good job :)

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Thanks guys, the feedback means a lot. Yeah, I make generic movies, but at least there are fellow genre lovers out there who see eye to eye with me. Not that I'm saying the film is perfect, but its always better to hear both sides.

Erik wrote:
Some people in your class do not know what the hell they're talking about!
This particular class is very divided. The head of the department is sort of a co-professor in the class and he is very much a film snob. His favorite director of all time is Yasujirō Ozu and the vibe I get off him sometimes is that he would prefer that we all aspire to make those kinds of films that are simple and real to life instead of genre movies. This particular professor also has stated in another class that he doesn't like Inception. There are also a couple of students in the class who kind of follow in his footsteps with this same kind of attitude. Some of you may refer to these kind of film/art students as hipsters. But anyway, this particular group speaks out more than the other half. The day I screened my rough cut, some of students who I relate more to were either absent from the class off shooting their own projects, or just didn't get the chance to speak up. The way I see it, I take the criticism of my two professors with a grain of salt, as pretty much a "you can do better" kind of approach to critiquing me, which I know I can do. But the few students in the class who just didn't get it, probably never will so they personally I couldn't really give two shits about. What I've learned from some of my favorite directors such as Lars Von Trier and Nicolas Winding Refn is that sometimes you have to not give a shit and make the movie that you personally want to make.

But yeah, sorry for the long-winded rant but thanks again.

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