[SPOILERS] Prometheus Theories Thread [SPOILERS]

All non-Nolan related film, tv, and streaming discussions.
User avatar
Posts: 21411
Joined: June 2010
Location: All-Hail Master Virgo, Censor of NolanFans
Prince why are you wasting your time? ;)

User avatar
Posts: 15427
Joined: June 2010
Location: You're pretty good.
RIFA wrote:Prince why are you wasting your time? ;)
Dunno, I think I wouldn't have cleared a lot of stuff for myself if I haven't been arguing about it :roll: :shh:

User avatar
Posts: 26266
Joined: February 2010
Location: Texas
Tykjen seems to frequent this thread and the Prometheus thread.

Please ignore him, just report him or pm me.
If she plays cranium she gives good brainium.

User avatar
Posts: 15427
Joined: June 2010
Location: You're pretty good.

User avatar
Posts: 6272
Joined: December 2010
Location: Space Truckin'
I just watched it once more and noticed that
when Dr Shaw enters Vickers' ejected pod in the end of the movie, there is a girl playing a violin in the hologram on the wall - the same girl playing a violin who was a part of a mixture of various scenes David was repeatedly looking at throughout the movie [to check whether David was capable of having emotions?]. Is there a significance? The girl had black hair, so it certainly isn't Vickers. And it wasn't young Shaw either. So then who is she?

Another thing I noticed is that Peter Weyland is 103 years old, and yet his daughter looks like she is only in her thirties. Seemed kinda weird to me.
And what did David actually say to the Engineer? The Engineers looks at David with interest, then glances at Weyland, then brushes David's hair gently before ripping his head off. I'm willing to bet that David did not say what either Weyland or Shaw wanted him to say.
Image

User avatar
Posts: 15427
Joined: June 2010
Location: You're pretty good.
No one knows about the whisper yet and yes we've been over how Vickers is in her thirties and possibly an android.

User avatar
Posts: 6272
Joined: December 2010
Location: Space Truckin'
prince0gotham wrote:No one knows about the whisper yet and yes we've been over how Vickers is in her thirties and possibly an android.
Yeah, I don't think she is an android TBH. The age difference seemed just too much to me. But then again, men can have children at any age. Like this dude, for example. So maybe, she is his natural born daughter after all.
Image

User avatar
Posts: 15427
Joined: June 2010
Location: You're pretty good.
oracle86 wrote:
prince0gotham wrote:No one knows about the whisper yet and yes we've been over how Vickers is in her thirties and possibly an android.
Yeah, I don't think she is an android TBH. The age difference seemed just too much to me. But then again, men can have children at any age. Like this dude, for example. So maybe, she is his natural born daughter after all.
It's not impossible just improbable. The way it's constructed you can go either way, but recently, she being a robot just starts making more sense.

-she overpowers David (but if she was human he would've let her do that anyway, especially if she's Weyland's daughter)
-in that scene they were both covered in blue light, something made me think there was a reason for that besides just visual effect
-the father thing might be a reference to Blade Runner
-Jude Law as a clue about why sex with her is possible
-most of all though it plays an interesting role in comparison to David

if Vickers is a robot she's definitely closer to the Asimov robots.

Anyway.


the link for a higher-res version you can get from here http://www.weylandchronicles.com/2012/0 ... rometheus/ i'm currently downloading it and am gonna upload it on youtube if it's really above 360p


http://www.cgsociety.org/index.php/CGSF ... prometheus

Image
Image
Image

User avatar
Posts: 15427
Joined: June 2010
Location: You're pretty good.
In Prometheus, Why Does David Identify Himself with Lawrence of Arabia?
Lawrence of Arabia is a story about a man entering a world he doesn't understand, gaining the respect of its people, and learning to become like them. Lawrence doesn't really fit into any society -- he's as uncomfortable dealing with the British as he is alien among the Arabs. There's also a magical, heady quality to his depiction in the film. He's constantly surprising the people around him, knocking them off balance, and earning their praise and respect. He's an outsider who swoops into a problem and solves it with his wits and bizarre perspectives. Intelligence and inhuman endurance are two of Lawrence's great assets. He suffers great indignity, his value to history and to society is overlooked or lost, and he responds by nurturing a heightened opinion of his own importance.

I'm guessing that David empathizes with Lawrence and imagines or aspires to have Lawrence's positive qualities. He's intelligent and enduring in the way that Lawrence is. He's an outsider who can never really be accepted by his society. And, like Lawrence, he's arguably better than all the people who consider themselves superior to him: he's smarter, more resilient, and unafraid of death. He's constantly being put down by everyone he interacts with, and because of this "second-class-citizen" status, he probably imagines that his contributions to the mission are being tragically overlooked in the same way that Lawrence's legacy dwindled away. Like Lawrence, one of his greatest wishes is to have his magnificence recognized.

Most intriguing is David's soft, rhythmic repetition of Lawrence's famous line of advice: "The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts." I think David watches this because he's studying Lawrence's brand of gallant showmanship. He knows he's superior; he wants to show it to everyone else. He wants to be praised. (And, in fact, there's an interview here where Fassbender talks about David's desire to be praised.

David gets his chance to swashbuckle like Peter O'Toole when Shaw is struck by the sandstorm: he leaps decisively out the side of the ship, saves Holloway, Shaw, and the head, gives them that cocky little "OK!" hand signal, and then reels them back in. His confident, eager body language shows how desperately he wants to show off. But he's not showered with praise afterward: everyone just ignores him.

David's final act before his injury also demonstrates his hunger to be praised. We don't really know what he says to the Engineer, but, like Lawrence, he suddenly bears the burden of a translator/communicator between two cultures. Finally, he's the focal point of the entire mission -- and the look of pure bliss on his face when the Engineer pats him on the head is heartbreaking, particularly since the Engineer's next act is to rip his head off. The culmination of all his work arrives, and he's not praised -- he's reduced to junk.

So: David has probably consciously recognized similarities between his life and Lawrence's. His ego develops along lines similar to Lawrence's. He then heightens the similarity even further by deliberately aping O'Toole's depiction of Lawrence. To David, Lawrence is both a mentor and a mirror.

Posts: 1433
Joined: May 2012
Location: Arizona
My friends and I (along with many others I've heard or read discussing the film) can't seem to figure out why the old man makeup approach was chosen for Pearce's character, Weyland. Pearce was great and IS always great in my opinion, but given that the awesome viral marketing clip of Pearce giving that awesome speech as Weyland was not present in the actual film, couldn't they have just gotten an actual, you know, old man to play old Weyland? I'm not criticizing the choice exactly (even though the old man makeup effects were glaringly less impressive than the rest of the movie's beautiful visuals) I'm just really curious as to whether or not anyone knows why this choice was made. It's one of the few nitpicks I had about the movie...okay that's not true I have a lot but it's one of the few that I can't seem to easily overlook. Thoughts?

Post Reply