What's the last book you've read?

All non-Nolan related film, tv, and streaming discussions.
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Station Eleven was pretty litty titty. It's really beautifully written and the ending gave me hope.

Now reading Run River by Joan Didion. I'm liking it so far. It's about depressed bitches, awful marriages, and California. I love that shit

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Okay so it's been a year since I read Stranger in a Strange Land but man, it's such a great book. I hope a great director will once tackle it.

Also, has anybody here read Waiting for the Barbarians? It's not widely purchasable here for some reason... But since the film is probably never coming out, I think I can read the book before it comes out lololol

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During this quarantine I've been watching good movies, eating good food, and reading good books too.

Here's some books I read in the past few weeks:

Prater Violet by Christopher Isherwood

It's a really short novella that satirizes the film industry and I think a lot of film buffs will love it. The characters are really fun and the way the creative process is illustrated is pretty hilarious. This book also takes place against the backdrop of World War 2 and it does a great job of showing
how even though world changing events are going on outside of work, the show must literally go on. It does a good job of illustrating how indifferent people can be during history and life changing events.
The Woman Without A Name by Laurence M. Janifer

This was one of the vintage paperbacks I had lying around. Before the plague I would usually buy a few vintage paperbacks from Half Price Books because they are legit fun collector's items and the coverart is always so nice.

The novel is short fast paced read and is very much gothic. A governess arrives at a manor to look over the two young girls. One day when she's on a walk she encounters a woman who SPOILER ALERT can't remember her name and the reason for her trauma has to do with the manor. The governess has to decide whether to stay or leave.

It's a fun trashy read that can easily be read in one sitting.

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel

After reading Station Eleven, I was really excited to learn that Mandel had a new book coming out. This book was published in like the last week of March I think.

Like Station Eleven, Glass Hotel has a pretty big cast of characters and they are all interconnected. But unlike its predecessor, the book doesn't really do a great job of making those connections streamlined. The novel doesn't really have the magic of it's predecessor but it's still a worthwhile engaging read. The characters deal with these pangs of regret (the overall plot is about a Bernie Madoff like Ponzi scheme that destroys the lives of many characters) and their struggles to deal with reality (often having vivid imagings of an alternate life).

I think it's still worth reading if you still remember 2008.

The Easter Parade by Richard Yates

Holy fuck where do I even begin with this? The only other Yates book I read was Revolutionary Road and like that novel, Easter Parade really just breaks your heart into a billion pieces.

The novel is about two sisters whose parents are divorced. They grow up with the sting of the divorce and lead very different lives. One gets married young and starts a family while the other becomes a career woman. The novel spans 4 decades of their lives and shows how they change and what they go through over the years.

The ending is really heartbreaking and was legit hard to read. But this was easily one of the best books I read in the past two weeks. It's definitely going to stay with me forever.

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Listening to American Psycho.

This is a fantastic novel and I'm impressed by how well it's represented by the film.

Bale captures the character immaculately.

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I'm finally getting audible as I wrap up War and Peace.

Any books or authors to check out now's the time to shout out.


-Vader

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thanks for nothin, folks ^

I wound up reading Mao II by DeLillo (my 4th of his---one of my favorite writers, living or dead) and just finally finished Pale Fire, which is as fun as any book I've read.

I think I'll do one or two smaller books (maybe Lolita or finally diving into Franzen via The Corrections) before diving into Anna Karenina.


-Vader

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I've read so much stuff since my last post. It will take a while to compile and share my thoughts.

Worst book I read though was The Story of The Eye.

Like idk, it's not like bad the prose is pretty good. Maybe I'm just dumb and didn't really get it idk

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Vader182 wrote:
July 13th, 2019, 2:47 am
I finished The Brothers Karamazov, not only my first Dostoevsky but my first substantial piece of Russian Literature. I had read a lot of Tolstoy's philosophical writings but that's all. It is a predictably heavy novel in tone and spirit, but what was not as predictable is the many moments of comedy and out-and-out satire. The central family has shades of the farcical melodrama of The Royal Tenenbaums or Magnificent Ambersons without losing that famed Russian humanism.

It's outstanding, one of the best books ever written on a bunch of interconnected themes but also probably one of the best written period. I can hardly name another book that better articulates the ignorant complicities of our behavior in the world, good and mostly bad, and how to lead a good, moral life that pleases ones soul in the process. It tackles the Problem of Evil and the Problem of Suffering in the world, and challenges the reader to what extent they contribute to either.

I have not related to a character as much as Ivan Karamazov since Hal from Infinite Jest.

I could not recommend this enough, particularly those living in spiritual angst.


-Vader
Vader182 wrote:
August 16th, 2020, 3:53 am
Any books or authors to check out now's the time to shout out.


-Vader
I highly recommend everything by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. This guy's whole career is a response to the problems posed in that novel. The Craving Mind by Judson Brewer is also life changing.

As for fiction, Eugene Onegin if you wanna stay with Russian classics. Don Quixote if you haven't already.

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