What's the last book you've read?

All non-Nolan related film, tv, and streaming discussions.
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Good Omens
:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

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Anyone go to any bookstores for Indie Bookstore Day yesterday?

I got three books since I'm on a budget at the moment. I got:
The Western Coast by Paula Fox. Karina Longworth included this in her list of top 5 Hollywood novels. After reading Didion's Play it As it Lays and basically all of Jacqueline Susann's bibliography, it's probably one of my favorite niche genre's now. It also crosses over with 40s-80s chick-lit which I also love and is surprisingly very very literary. Chick-lit does not get enough love and it should.

The Easter Parade by Richard Yates. I read Revolutionary Road by Yates when I was like 15 I think. I didn't really get it that much but man that book was haunting and it made me realize the stuff I dislike about American life and capitalism. The film is of course excellent with DiCaprio and Winslet playing the parts perfectly.

Tentacle by Rita Indiana. Never heard of this author before but the summary on the back sounded super interesting. The author is from the Dominican Republic and the novel takes place in Santo Domingo. I've been trying to make an effort to include more authors of different backgrounds into what I read so that I can get more viewpoints and I think as a creative it's one of the most important things you can do to improve your own work.

Currently I am reading Under the Skin by Michael Faber. I haven't seen Glazer's film yet but apparently the two have the same premise but handle it very differently. The novel is satirical and very engaging. After this I want to read Little Women. The Criterion Channel will put up a lot of George Cukor films next month and he directed one of the many adaptations. So I want to read the book first before watching Cukor's take on it.

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started Jurassic Park, and I'm sorta shocked by how heady and meticulously "scientific" it is, I mean, relatively

and I have to admit even the "World" movies seem to capture the spirit of the crossroads between corporate/capitalist interest and advanced science and the inherent dangers that Crichton made clear

I mean at the core of it, it seems to be a giant allegory for personal wealth investment gone haywire and gross corporate incompetence

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I just finished Dune finally, I've been saving the last bit for when I could get through it in one sitting.

Denis is gunna rip that shit up

alternatively, I am nervous for the backlash for a white dude
leading tons of brown people to a great victory.

-Vader

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Vader182 wrote:
May 6th, 2019, 7:17 pm
I just finished Dune finally, I've been saving the last bit for when I could get through it in one sitting.

Denis is gunna rip that shit up

alternatively, I am nervous for the backlash for a white dude
leading tons of brown people to a great victory.

-Vader
Is that literally how it is in the book or does it have to do with Denis' casting?

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It's sort of the whole point of the book. Major
TE Lawrence vibes.

-Vader

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I Should Have Stayed Home by Horace McCoy

Great Hollywood novel. Karina Longworth listed it as one of her top 5 Hollywood novels.

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Cilogy wrote:
May 6th, 2019, 7:14 pm
started Jurassic Park, and I'm sorta shocked by how heady and meticulously "scientific" it is, I mean, relatively

and I have to admit even the "World" movies seem to capture the spirit of the crossroads between corporate/capitalist interest and advanced science and the inherent dangers that Crichton made clear

I mean at the core of it, it seems to be a giant allegory for personal wealth investment gone haywire and gross corporate incompetence
you're shocked that a crichton book is heady and meticulous? :P

I remember reading it (and its sequel) a decade back and thinking how cerebral it is. :lol:

The problem with World movies (well first one, haven't bothered with new one) is that while poking fun at some things, it indulges in them anyway. Very few movies can pull off having their cake and eating it and JW movies are not those movies.

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Vader182 wrote:
May 6th, 2019, 7:17 pm
I just finished Dune finally, I've been saving the last bit for when I could get through it in one sitting.

Denis is gunna rip that shit up

alternatively, I am nervous for the backlash for a white dude
leading tons of brown people to a great victory.

-Vader
My anticipation of Denis adapting the (first half of the) first book is through the roof.

As for the
"white saviour" iirc the Fremen came from all over the universe to Arrakis and considering how they've cast some of the Fremen I don't think everyone will be darker skinned in the film so I think that takes care of that.
Also I think it would be a nice idea to open the film with a prologue á la Fellowship of the Ring. Some short introduction to this crazy universe would be helpful for the larger audience imo.

Any chances it will in fact end up being rated R?

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I don't really care what your opinions on Danielle Steel's books are but there is no denying that this woman has an amazing work ethic. She's worth $350 million and she's still writing books.
There's a sign in Danielle Steel's office that reads, "There are no miracles. There is only discipline." It's a dutiful message, and yet the sheer amount that Steel has accomplished in her five-decade career does seem like the stuff of dreams.

Let's look at the numbers, shall we? The author has written 179 books, which have been translated into 43 languages. Twenty-two of them have been adapted for television, and two of those adaptations have received Golden Globe nominations. Steel releases seven new novels a year—her latest, Blessing in Disguise, is out this week—and she's at work on five to six new titles at all times. In 1989 Steel was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records for having a book on the New York Times best-seller list for the most consecutive weeks of any author—381, to be exact. To pull it off, she works 20 to 22 hours a day. (A few times a month, when she feels the crunch, she spends a full 24 hours at her desk.)

Steel writes in her home office. Most of the time, that's San Francisco, but sometimes she's at her house in Paris. Wherever she is, she writes on her 1946 Olympia standard typewriter, which she's nicknamed Olly. "Olly's a big, heavy machine and it's older than I am," Steel tells Glamour. "It has a very smooth flow to it and I can't write on anything else. I have anywhere between 12 to 15 of them that I've bought over the years, but they're not good enough to work on. I keep them for parts in case there's ever a problem, because this is a very endangered species!" Steel is a creature of habit. She gets to her office—down the hall from her bedroom—by 8:00 A.M., where she can often be found in her cashmere nightgown. In the morning she'll have one piece of toast and an iced decaf coffee (she gave up full-throated caffeine 25 years ago). As the day wears on, she'll nibble on miniature bittersweet chocolate bars. "Dead or alive, rain or shine, I get to my desk and I do my work. Sometimes I'll finish a book in the morning, and by the end of the day, I've started another project," Steel says.
https://www.glamour.com/story/danielle- ... CmSQSJy4q8

Very inspiring and definitely motivates me to get shit done.

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