Shame (2011)

All non-Nolan related film, tv, and streaming discussions.
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Talli asked me to post his thoughts after seeing Shame ... it's pretty glowing. The highlighted section caught my eye.
It’s almost impossible to give a full review of this film without spoiling it.

In many ways it reminded me of Inception. The story is bracketed by the same image just like Inception (Cobb waking up on the beach). The story follows a character who is haunted by his past just like Inception. The ending is trippy just like Inception. “Just like Inception”-Saito

In fact, the ending will prove to be way more trippy, for those who are familiar with literary devices, foreshadowing, and all that jazz.

Here, Steve McQueen is your Cobb. Masterfully and Subtly planting ideas and thoughts via images, music, and sound. Nicolas Winding Refn prides himself on the fact that he is a visual filmmaker, well, here McQueen out-Refn’s Refn.

You grow to love and hate the lack of information about the character’s backgrounds. It frustrates throughout the journey. But in the end there is a huge pay off, because you can’t help but put as many spins on the complicated relationship between the brother and sister, and just what happened at the end. And that’s refreshing.

On the topic of Michael's performance. It is hands down, the best film/screen acting I have ever seen. He is as vile as Daniel Day Lewis in Blood, as mentally fragile and disturved as Robert DeNiro in Taxi Driver, as see through as James Stewart was at his best. For me, it was definitely a masterclass in film acting.

There was a cool moment in the film, that was obviously improvised more than others. I’m not gonna tell you what it is, because it was hilarious and surprising, but the interesting thing about it, is that in retrospect, Brandon sort of reveals his nature when it comes to relationships, with that little action.

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Crazy Eight wrote:Talli asked me to post his thoughts after seeing Shame ... it's pretty glowing. The highlighted section caught my eye.
It’s almost impossible to give a full review of this film without spoiling it.

In many ways it reminded me of Inception. The story is bracketed by the same image just like Inception (Cobb waking up on the beach). The story follows a character who is haunted by his past just like Inception. The ending is trippy just like Inception. “Just like Inception”-Saito

In fact, the ending will prove to be way more trippy, for those who are familiar with literary devices, foreshadowing, and all that jazz.

Here, Steve McQueen is your Cobb. Masterfully and Subtly planting ideas and thoughts via images, music, and sound. Nicolas Winding Refn prides himself on the fact that he is a visual filmmaker, well, here McQueen out-Refn’s Refn.

You grow to love and hate the lack of information about the character’s backgrounds. It frustrates throughout the journey. But in the end there is a huge pay off, because you can’t help but put as many spins on the complicated relationship between the brother and sister, and just what happened at the end. And that’s refreshing.

On the topic of Michael's performance. It is hands down, the best film/screen acting I have ever seen. He is as vile as Daniel Day Lewis in Blood, as mentally fragile and disturved as Robert DeNiro in Taxi Driver, as see through as James Stewart was at his best. For me, it was definitely a masterclass in film acting.

There was a cool moment in the film, that was obviously improvised more than others. I’m not gonna tell you what it is, because it was hilarious and surprising, but the interesting thing about it, is that in retrospect, Brandon sort of reveals his nature when it comes to relationships, with that little action.
:lol:

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He did however, clarify that screen acting is a "specific type of acting." The example he used was the Heath's performance in Brokeback Mountain is screen acting, whereas the Joker is not. So... yeah.

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SO what's The Joker? Stage-acting?

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Crazy Eight wrote:He did however, clarify that screen acting is a "specific type of acting." The example he used was the Heath's performance in Brokeback Mountain is screen acting, whereas the Joker is not. So... yeah.
Talli always over reacts on initial responses. He said Avatar was the best film of the decade.

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Talli says, from the chatroom, that if you guys have "any questions" they can ask him on chat.

(I don't know wtf you're on about people, with talli and all, but I don't want to be involved in it. So don't, please, criticize me for posting this.)

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Talli on Fassbender's penis- "i thought it was average sized no homo"

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Crazy Eight wrote:Talli asked me to post his thoughts after seeing Shame ... it's pretty glowing. The highlighted section caught my eye.
It’s almost impossible to give a full review of this film without spoiling it.

In many ways it reminded me of Inception. The story is bracketed by the same image just like Inception (Cobb waking up on the beach). The story follows a character who is haunted by his past just like Inception. The ending is trippy just like Inception. “Just like Inception”-Saito

In fact, the ending will prove to be way more trippy, for those who are familiar with literary devices, foreshadowing, and all that jazz.

Here, Steve McQueen is your Cobb. Masterfully and Subtly planting ideas and thoughts via images, music, and sound. Nicolas Winding Refn prides himself on the fact that he is a visual filmmaker, well, here McQueen out-Refn’s Refn.

You grow to love and hate the lack of information about the character’s backgrounds. It frustrates throughout the journey. But in the end there is a huge pay off, because you can’t help but put as many spins on the complicated relationship between the brother and sister, and just what happened at the end. And that’s refreshing.

On the topic of Michael's performance. It is hands down, the best film/screen acting I have ever seen. He is as vile as Daniel Day Lewis in Blood, as mentally fragile and disturved as Robert DeNiro in Taxi Driver, as see through as James Stewart was at his best. For me, it was definitely a masterclass in film acting.

There was a cool moment in the film, that was obviously improvised more than others. I’m not gonna tell you what it is, because it was hilarious and surprising, but the interesting thing about it, is that in retrospect, Brandon sort of reveals his nature when it comes to relationships, with that little action.

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