Last Film You Watched? VI

All non-Nolan related film, tv, and streaming discussions.
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Scream 1, 2 and 3
Out of these 3 films, I think I prefer the first one, simply because it is a legitimate thriller and an original concept that subverts the slasher tropes more than its successors and even after having rewatched it multiple times there are still thrills to be had here. Scream 2 is still very good, though I am less sold on the climax of the film this time around. I am less impressed with the third one overall but it is still entertaining enough for what it is.

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Hotel Mumbai (2018) - uhm holy shit this was so intense. i just kept internally freaking out over every aspect of this movie - from armie hammer and dev patel being in danger (ok i kid i kid), to the dread everyone was going through and the shitty logistics of the rescue efforts by the govt. It seems like most main characters were fictionalized here, so I can’t tell how dramatized (or exploitative) it was, but the tone of the film felt incredibly authentic and brutal.

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Location: stuck in 2020
ikr? I thought it was really gripping and intense

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Cromwell (1970)
A good but historically very inaccurate film about the English civil war and the execution of Charles I. Richard Harris chews the scenery as Cromwell like he's going to starve. Alec McGuiness plays the king masterfully and the soundtrack's quite something to behold but do not for one second mistake this for anything other than the broadest of broad strokes of a historical account.

Zodiac (2007)
David Fincher's best film to date and it's sad that he has not managed to make something as gripping as this in the last 13 years.

Se7en (1995)
By comparison, I find the trope of the serial murderer with an artistic vision/religious purpose to be less compelling and while the ending puts all the pieces into place, the film just kind of...ends with a voice-over narration. The murders are quite brutal (though some are a bit implausible,
sloth
in particular) and Morgan Freeman's acting is excellent. Brad Pitt's character was more obnoxious this time around than I remember and while it makes sense for the film, it's no less annoying.

The Philadelphia Story (1940)
Overall, I feel like there's something questionable about
a woman getting back together with a man who was, from what I understood, abusive towards her
and ultimately the film seems to be about her learning to be more forgiving of the terrible behaviour of the men in her life (
meaning her father and ex-husband
). However, the film admittedly also is about self-realisation and confrontation of one's own flaws. I do not know how this would be received nowadays. There were a number of scenes where I was not sure whether the film was endorsing the terrible behaviour or commenting on it. However, the dialogue exchanges are witty and the strong writing leads to fun clashes of personalities. However, the film does feel like it belongs in a different time.

Wuthering Heights (1939)
Not the most faithful adaptation from what I hear but I have not read the source material and found the film compelling on its own terms. It's quite fascinating how flawed the two main characters are and how they themselves stand in the way of their own happiness and what they obviously desire. There is one scene in particular that involves a pair of dirty hands that would not get much appreciation nowadays I would say, nor would the character to whom said hands belong get much sympathy for what happens in that moment of anger. Alas, the British class system again plays its cruel tricks on these tormented characters but they themselves, their inability to communicate honestly and bad circumstances seal their fate. Olivier is particularly strong as Heathcliff and it will be difficult to look at another adaptation of this story and not compare other actors to him. It's also quite impressive how they made California look like fog-ridden England.
Last edited by Batfan175 on November 30th, 2020, 5:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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I love The Philadelphia Story, Hepburn, Grant and Stewart are having so much fun, Hepburn's little sister is so funny, the scene when she plays piano makes me laugh out loud even on third or fourth viewing. If made today, the flaws of Grant would be a little different, but the message remains: trying to be less judgemental, and accepting of people's failures. The play was written to mock Hepburn's reputation of being high standard by one of her friend.

Wyler's Wuthering Heights only adapts the first half of the book. And from another point of view than the one of the book: we're strictly limited to Nelly's point of view and don't get much interactions just between Heathcliff and Catherine in the book. In a way, it's so unfaithful, that it doesn't even spoil the book.
Therefore I'd advise reading the book, which is great, Emily Brontë's style is so dense, the way she makes you feel like you're walking through the hills of Yorkshire is impressive, the violence of the dialogue is insane. So many lines just hit hard and stay with you. "The entire world is a dreadful collection of memoranda that she did exist and that I have lost her." "Would you like to live with your soul in the grave?"
It's simply one of the great novel.

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Batfan175 wrote:
November 29th, 2020, 11:38 am

Zodiac (2007)
David Fincher's best film to date and it's sad that he has not managed to make something as gripping as this in the last 13 years.
He has. And it's not sad because you're wrong.

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The Philadelphia Story is one of the great romantic comedies of all-time. You have three of the greatest actors of the Golden Era (Stewart, Grant and Hepburn), an incredibly witty script, and a strong, independent female character (in an era when that isn't all that common).

For my money, It Happened One Night, His Girl Friday, The Philadelphia Story, Roman Holiday, and The Apartment are the high points in the rom-com genre.

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Ozymandias wrote:
November 29th, 2020, 7:30 pm
The Philadelphia Story is one of the great romantic comedies of all-time. You have three of the greatest actors of the Golden Era (Stewart, Grant and Hepburn), an incredibly witty script, and a strong, independent female character (in an era when that isn't all that common).

For my money, It Happened One Night, His Girl Friday, The Philadelphia Story, Roman Holiday, and The Apartment are the high points in the rom-com genre.
I looove Roman Holiday and The Apartment. The other three you name are really great too. That makes Cukor, Capra, Hawks, Wyler and Wilder. I think you've gotta have a Lubitsch. The Shop around the corner is quite perfect. But Cluny Brown, Bluebeard's Eighth Wife, Heaven can wait are also masterpieces. Well, all things consider you need to have Lubitsch's filmography :lol: .
I mean, from Angel to Cluny Brown, it's quite the most incredible succession of films by a director in less than ten years, even better than Hitchcock 1954-1961 imo.

Also, about Wilder, if The apartment is his perfect rom-com, I would advise people to discover Love in the Afternoon, much better than the better known Sabrina (not that Sabrina is bad, mind you, it's just far from the heights Wilder can reach) Avanti is also very sweet. And there's a nice parallel with The Godfather which was released around the same time
(son going to South Italy and ending up becoming alike his father despite his hopes to be a more moral man)

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Demoph wrote:
November 29th, 2020, 8:03 pm
Ozymandias wrote:
November 29th, 2020, 7:30 pm
The Philadelphia Story is one of the great romantic comedies of all-time. You have three of the greatest actors of the Golden Era (Stewart, Grant and Hepburn), an incredibly witty script, and a strong, independent female character (in an era when that isn't all that common).

For my money, It Happened One Night, His Girl Friday, The Philadelphia Story, Roman Holiday, and The Apartment are the high points in the rom-com genre.
I looove Roman Holiday and The Apartment. The other three you name are really great too. That makes Cukor, Capra, Hawks, Wyler and Wilder. I think you've gotta have a Lubitsch. The Shop around the corner is quite perfect. But Cluny Brown, Bluebeard's Eighth Wife, Heaven can wait are also masterpieces. Well, all things consider you need to have Lubitsch's filmography :lol: .
I mean, from Angel to Cluny Brown, it's quite the most incredible succession of films by a director in less than ten years, even better than Hitchcock 1954-1961 imo.

Also, about Wilder, if The apartment is his perfect rom-com, I would advise people to discover Love in the Afternoon, much better than the better known Sabrina (not that Sabrina is bad, mind you, it's just far from the heights Wilder can reach) Avanti is also very sweet. And there's a nice parallel with The Godfather which was released around the same time
(son going to South Italy and ending up becoming alike his father despite his hopes to be a more moral man)
There are a few of those I have yet to see and I will definitely check out.

A bit of a change of topic but for anyone who is a fan of Cinema Paradiso it is being released on 4k in about a week. I'm very excited to see one of the greatest coming of age films in 4k HDR.

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bootsy wrote:
November 29th, 2020, 3:32 pm
Batfan175 wrote:
November 29th, 2020, 11:38 am

Zodiac (2007)
David Fincher's best film to date and it's sad that he has not managed to make something as gripping as this in the last 13 years.
He has. And it's not sad because you're wrong.
No he hasn't. Fincher to me is an overrated director who is at his best when he does depressing crime thriller stuff, which was a while ago. But that's just my opinion, if you love his later stuff that's totally cool, I'm just not part of the group of admirers of his later oeuvre.

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