James Bond Official Discussion Thread

All non-Nolan related film, tv, and streaming discussions.
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RIP Claudine Auger.

One of the best Bond girl. Thunderball is by far the Connery's film with the best female characters.


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oh no

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Went back and watched the first 4 films recently when they were available on Amazon.

Gotta say this is the first time all the misogyny nonsense really got to me. Like, I knew it was always there and I've seen how much it's been referenced in pop culture. But, like this time it really hit me, like to the point that it actually conflicted with my enjoyment of the film. That hadn't happened before. I kind of brushed it aside, or worse, thought it was behavior that you should aspire for as a confident and powerful man.

At the risk of trying to be woke, watching it now, it reads problematic.



Like, imagine that last part without any music.

Am I crazy to think that she shows absolutely no signs of being into him? Like, at least with other "Bond girls", even if he's being super forward and inappropriate, they at least show that the woman welcomes it in part. If anything she's constantly having to rebuff him. And in the end she like literally says no several times and he forces her into the bath.

Perhaps they're trying to convey that she like knows it's wrong, but actually wants him, but maybe it's just cut poorly. So I get that part of is like how filmmaking plays with the viewer's perception. Like in the way changing lighting can make a romantic scene a horror scene. But I can't imagine the filmmakers in the 60s would have thought too much about it, because that was an acceptable thing then and within the scope of Bond's whole persona.

I watch these scenes now and it's uncomfortable. Those scenes don't come across as "iconic", but rather quite pervy.

And it's weird cuz as a boy I grew up watching these films thinking Connery's Bond was the epitome of cool. Is he still? I don't know. Either way, it's making me dissect a major part of my childhood in a pretty huge way, because Bond was centrally formative in my personality and sense of style.

Perhaps things are different now cuz I have a steady gf and I've also just finished Bojack Horseman, which tackles these things.

idk

Cilogy wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 1:30 pm
idk
you do tho

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Law
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Cilogy wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 1:30 pm
Went back and watched the first 4 films recently when they were available on Amazon.

Gotta say this is the first time all the misogyny nonsense really got to me. Like, I knew it was always there and I've seen how much it's been referenced in pop culture. But, like this time it really hit me, like to the point that it actually conflicted with my enjoyment of the film. That hadn't happened before. I kind of brushed it aside, or worse, thought it was behavior that you should aspire for as a confident and powerful man.

At the risk of trying to be woke, watching it now, it reads problematic.



Like, imagine that last part without any music.

Am I crazy to think that she shows absolutely no signs of being into him? Like, at least with other "Bond girls", even if he's being super forward and inappropriate, they at least show that the woman welcomes it in part. If anything she's constantly having to rebuff him. And in the end she like literally says no several times and he forces her into the bath.

Perhaps they're trying to convey that she like knows it's wrong, but actually wants him, but maybe it's just cut poorly. So I get that part of is like how filmmaking plays with the viewer's perception. Like in the way changing lighting can make a romantic scene a horror scene. But I can't imagine the filmmakers in the 60s would have thought too much about it, because that was an acceptable thing then and within the scope of Bond's whole persona.

I watch these scenes now and it's uncomfortable. Those scenes don't come across as "iconic", but rather quite pervy.

And it's weird cuz as a boy I grew up watching these films thinking Connery's Bond was the epitome of cool. Is he still? I don't know. Either way, it's making me dissect a major part of my childhood in a pretty huge way, because Bond was centrally formative in my personality and sense of style.

Perhaps things are different now cuz I have a steady gf and I've also just finished Bojack Horseman, which tackles these things.

idk
It's a movie

From the 60s

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Law wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 3:52 pm
Cilogy wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 1:30 pm
Went back and watched the first 4 films recently when they were available on Amazon.

Gotta say this is the first time all the misogyny nonsense really got to me. Like, I knew it was always there and I've seen how much it's been referenced in pop culture. But, like this time it really hit me, like to the point that it actually conflicted with my enjoyment of the film. That hadn't happened before. I kind of brushed it aside, or worse, thought it was behavior that you should aspire for as a confident and powerful man.

At the risk of trying to be woke, watching it now, it reads problematic.



Like, imagine that last part without any music.

Am I crazy to think that she shows absolutely no signs of being into him? Like, at least with other "Bond girls", even if he's being super forward and inappropriate, they at least show that the woman welcomes it in part. If anything she's constantly having to rebuff him. And in the end she like literally says no several times and he forces her into the bath.

Perhaps they're trying to convey that she like knows it's wrong, but actually wants him, but maybe it's just cut poorly. So I get that part of is like how filmmaking plays with the viewer's perception. Like in the way changing lighting can make a romantic scene a horror scene. But I can't imagine the filmmakers in the 60s would have thought too much about it, because that was an acceptable thing then and within the scope of Bond's whole persona.

I watch these scenes now and it's uncomfortable. Those scenes don't come across as "iconic", but rather quite pervy.

And it's weird cuz as a boy I grew up watching these films thinking Connery's Bond was the epitome of cool. Is he still? I don't know. Either way, it's making me dissect a major part of my childhood in a pretty huge way, because Bond was centrally formative in my personality and sense of style.

Perhaps things are different now cuz I have a steady gf and I've also just finished Bojack Horseman, which tackles these things.

idk
It's a movie

From the 60s
You say that like it changes anything Cil said

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"It is what it is"...

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The sexism is wrong af but sadly not a wrong depiction of the given time. Simple commercials from back then were sexist af too just to name one thing.

I'm glad we're passed that, although not 100% clear and we probably never will be. But I don't think they're a reason not to watch those films. As wrong as the sexism is, and it's in the books too, they're not the whole thing. Of course, you can discard them like that but then there's an incredible amount of things you suddenly couldn't watch or read etc. It's good to know what's wrong and to be well aware of that but it's something else entirely to brush the whole thing off just because. Like said before, then you're looking for saints where there just barely are any, if any at all.

I love the Craig/Bond era so much because of how much more modern they are, including with their depiction of the women in Bonds life. Casino Royale alone comments on this so well. I think it's great that Bond has evolved for the better.

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