Star Wars Universe Discussion Thread

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Ace wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 6:43 pm
New 'Star Wars' Movie in the Works With 'Sleight' Filmmaker

As Lucasfilm maps out the next phase of Star Wars movies, executives are grappling with this question as development moves ahead: Which characters and stories justify theatrical releases and which should arrive exclusively on streaming platform Disney+?

The Hollywood Reporter learned Friday that a new Star Wars project is in the works: J.D. Dillard, best known for writing and directing the sci-fi thriller Sleight, and Matt Owens, a writer on Marvel shows Luke Cage and Agents of SHIELD, have been tapped to develop it. But insiders say it is undecided whether the project will be for the big screen or for the highly prioritized streaming platform.

Plot details, character details and setting details are unknown and are being kept in the murky underworld of Exegol. It is unclear whether Dillard would direct should the project move forward. The Dillard project is understood to be unrelated to a Star Wars film pitch by Marvel Studios chief Kevin Feige and potential work from Last Jedi director Rian Johnson.
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat ... ns-1280459
Okay?

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Very excited to share this one, I wrote about how Miyazaki is the single greatest influence on the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy as my third piece for RogerEbert.com.

According to the Shinto tradition, our relationship with the Kami is symbiotic with nature; they are invisible to the human eye, yet often manifest as an object, like the sacred tree in “My Neighbor Totoro.” Lucas or Johnson might call such locations “strong with the force,” hubs with the greatest connection to the energy of all living things, such as Ahch-To’s mist-enshrouded Jedi Tree or the mirror cave that gives Rey her second force vision.

To Miyazaki but also in Rian Johnson’s “The Last Jedi,” we are the failed stewards of the natural world. This is why Miyazaki’s villains are often hawkish abusers of the Earth. “Princess Mononoke’s” Lady Eboshi goes full Saruman on the nearby forest to build weapons, only to use those weapons against wolf and boar gods outside Iron Town. While she is benevolent to her own disenfranchised residents, her violence and hubris towards the forest and the life inside it triggers a chain reaction that “curses” the main character, Ashitaka, that ignites rage and violence inside him he can barely control, a Miyazaki equivalent of the dark side.
Spent a lot of time on this one, please read the full essay here: https://www.rogerebert.com/features/nau ... el-trilogy

**note, there are spoilers for Nausicaä in the last few paragraphs if you haven't seen it**

-Vader

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Very interesting read especially the last paragraphs: Luke/Ashikata & Rey/Nausicaa.
I would though tend to disagree about the humanist moments: I think there are quite a few in the prequel, mostly Anakin and Padme in AOTC just playing in beautiful landscape (yes, it's plot related because of the love story, but it's also sometimes about just enjoying nature).
About Johnson's relation with nature, I had noted that TLJ was the only SW with ROTS to not have a monstrous creature at some point (but in ROTS, it's more because there was no time for other characters than human). And your article showed how Abrams built on that with the giant snake in TROS.
In TFA, the creature that Han has on his ship is however like the horrible and purely evil creatures of the original SW.

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Has JJ ever mentioned he is a Miyazaki fan? I know Rian has. Did not get a chance to fully read the piece yet but will.

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Allstar wrote:
April 16th, 2020, 12:17 pm
Has JJ ever mentioned he is a Miyazaki fan? I know Rian has. Did not get a chance to fully read the piece yet but will.
He hasn't, but the art department has on TFA and TROS (in the art books and elsewhere) so it's reasonable to think he's aware of visual similarities.

That said, most of my piece is critical analysis and not intended to be an official one to one influence, which I address in the essay.

Thanks for the kind words Demoph, means a lot!


-Vader

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