Book versus Film

The 2006 film about rival magicians desperately trying to learn the secrets of each others tricks.
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Well it started off good and I thought Hess was gonna have a bigger role in it, esspecially that there are a lot of rumours about him. I found the whole story with the brothers boring tbh, but I liked it when they were at the Olympics.

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I didn't even know there was a book! :lol: I'm gonna have to read it :mrgreen:

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Yea I haven't read it either but I know the characters are better described, like the Alfred comes from Albert and Frederic, that the machine works differently, I have to read it.

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i read it.
film is wayy better because the prestige in the film is reveling the way they both did the transported man.
the book doesnt do that

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#1fan wrote:i read it.
film is wayy better because the prestige in the film is reveling the way they both did the transported man.
the book doesnt do that
That's what makes Nolan's take on the novel so brilliant. He changes the whole nature of the story to fit the film medium. And as many have said before, they're so different from one another, it's impossible to say one is better.. but they both fit their particular mediums perfectly. The fact that "The Prestige" in the title takes on a different significance in the film than it did in the book is a stroke of genius.

One of the more central arguments I see recurring is whether Borden and Fallon were brothers or clones. In the book there is little doubt, and while I have an opinion about which is true in the film, you have to say that Nolan certainly left that up to the viewer. Those little enticing tidbits make the movie a lot of fun.

The Prestige is the ultimate adaptation.. one that isn't encumbered by the time limitations of film. There is not a single trim or alteration from the source material that feels forced, inappropriate, or leaves the film version of the story lacking. How many adapted films can you say that about? Not many in my view.

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good book! read twice!
good film! seen 200 times!

does anyone know the alias alfred borden uses in the book when he goes upstage to examine something or he gives angier a note or something?

it was like an anagram of his name! cant remember it! :?: :!:

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James wrote:good book! read twice!
good film! seen 200 times!

does anyone know the alias alfred borden uses in the book when he goes upstage to examine something or he gives angier a note or something?

it was like an anagram of his name! cant remember it! :?: :!:
Ages ago since I read it, sorry dude can't remember.

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I recall this acronym,

Alfred Borden Robert Angier = ABRA as in abra cadabra...

but I think that's just from IMDB, not the book necessarily. Either way, its kind of cool and not sure if its even intentional.

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I just finished the novel in preparation for my Nolan thesis, so I will try to make my comment on this thread brief. Of course, my opinion is completely subjective (and includes spoilers). The film is very different from the novel. Both have their pros/cons, but in the end I prefer the film. Here's why:
It's difficult to approach the book objectively because I had seen the film long before (I saw it in theaters in October 2006). Let me just say that the book is much concerned with the magic aspect than the relationship between Borden and Angier. Yes, the feud between the two men makes an appearance every few pages and is a central aspect to the novel, but it is given much less weight and significance than as seen in the film version. Also, as others on this thread have already mentioned, the timeline of the book overruns the timeline of the film. While the film strictly focuses on the lives of Borden and Angier from their beginnings in performance til their respective deaths, the book extends to generations beyond that.

Alright, I'm already boring myself. Let me just say that the film takes the most interesting part of the novel and makes it infinitely better. The rivalry between two budding magicians is a very interesting plotline that, I think, wasn't done justice in the novel. Throughout, Angier and Borden repeatedly admit (to themselves, or their loved ones in Angier's case) that the feud is infantile and completely absurd. In the film, neither really ever backs down--it's a constant descent into madness for the both of them. For me, The Prestige on film was truly a character study of two men utterly obsessed with one-upping each other. In the novel, the obsession is evident but not entirely believable or engaging because of the constant reminders that neither magician really wants anything to do with it. In the film, they are much more cutthroat. As the novel progresses, the author seems to become, instead, more interested in the dangers of "true" magic. The last section of the film had a real "Frankenstein" feeling to it that was concerned with real-world consequences of such "true" magic. In the film, Angier's final apparatus, courtesy of Tesla, seemed more a realized metaphor for how deep the rivalry between he and Angier had become. For me, I never really thought about the dangers of cloning because they never really presented themselves to me as I was watching; rather, I was more startled by the lengths a man (any man) would go to satiate his obsessive desires. Also, I simply think that the general plot is better suited for film. In the novel the two narratives are completely separated while in the film they are ingeniously intertwined. In the end, I much prefer the film, but I saw it before I read its source material, so you can take it with a grain of salt. And the climax in the novel did almost nothing for me, besides quickening my pulse for a bit with its ghost-story-like ending.
I will say, however, that The Prestige remains my favorite Nolan film and I have even more respect and admiration for him (and his brother) after reading the book and seeing how they translated it to film.

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Film is better-because it has better ending,better story telling then the book :clap:

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