Book versus Film

The 2006 film about rival magicians desperately trying to learn the secrets of each others tricks.
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I've heard the Film is better
"When art imitates life"
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The book was hard to follow for me and different from the movie. LOVED the film:-)

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oracle86 wrote:According to Wikipedia-
Author Christopher Priest saw the film three times as of January 5, 2007, and his reaction was " 'Well, holy shit.' I was thinking, 'God, I like that,' and 'Oh, I wish I'd thought of that.' "
Christopher Priest seems to have cooled on the film since then though:
In some ways, the film of The Prestige is quite different to the book. How do you feel as a writer about film directors altering your work?

They do their job and I do mine. I deliberately did not involve myself with the adaptation of The Prestige, because I was interested to see what Christopher Nolan would do with it. At the time I thought he was a serious and interesting talent. (He's gone downhill a bit since those days. Too many Batman films, and all that.) Also, I wanted to see what Hollywood would do with something I thought was highly unlikely as a Hollywood project. With hindsight, I wish I had known what Nolan was going to do with the ending (he takes a huge chance with it), and would have said a few things to him about that. But on the whole, I feel it is "his" film, just as the novel is "mine". The only thing that seriously irritated me was Nolan's attitude that the book hadn't existed before he came along and made the film. In fact it had been in print for twelve years, and was in translations around the world. In several interviews he urged people not to read the book, as it "ruined" his film. You don't feel warm to someone like that.

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Insomniac wrote:
Christopher Priest seems to have cooled on the film since then though:
In some ways, the film of The Prestige is quite different to the book. How do you feel as a writer about film directors altering your work?

They do their job and I do mine. I deliberately did not involve myself with the adaptation of The Prestige, because I was interested to see what Christopher Nolan would do with it. At the time I thought he was a serious and interesting talent. (He's gone downhill a bit since those days. Too many Batman films, and all that.) Also, I wanted to see what Hollywood would do with something I thought was highly unlikely as a Hollywood project. With hindsight, I wish I had known what Nolan was going to do with the ending (he takes a huge chance with it), and would have said a few things to him about that. But on the whole, I feel it is "his" film, just as the novel is "mine". The only thing that seriously irritated me was Nolan's attitude that the book hadn't existed before he came along and made the film. In fact it had been in print for twelve years, and was in translations around the world. In several interviews he urged people not to read the book, as it "ruined" his film. You don't feel warm to someone like that.
Very interesting opinion on that.
I think he's offended by the fact people forget this was based on a book.
And he's descended into the generic "I hate the unimaginative Hollywood scabs" thing that Alan Moore etc have fallen into.

Also, saying he went downhill since Prestige is the worst comment I've ever heard.

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Insomniac wrote:Christopher Priest seems to have cooled on the film since then though:
In some ways, the film of The Prestige is quite different to the book. How do you feel as a writer about film directors altering your work?

They do their job and I do mine. I deliberately did not involve myself with the adaptation of The Prestige, because I was interested to see what Christopher Nolan would do with it. At the time I thought he was a serious and interesting talent. (He's gone downhill a bit since those days. Too many Batman films, and all that.) Also, I wanted to see what Hollywood would do with something I thought was highly unlikely as a Hollywood project. With hindsight, I wish I had known what Nolan was going to do with the ending (he takes a huge chance with it), and would have said a few things to him about that. But on the whole, I feel it is "his" film, just as the novel is "mine". The only thing that seriously irritated me was Nolan's attitude that the book hadn't existed before he came along and made the film. In fact it had been in print for twelve years, and was in translations around the world. In several interviews he urged people not to read the book, as it "ruined" his film. You don't feel warm to someone like that.
Did Nolan really say that? I find that hard to believe.

I found this interview where the Nolan bros talk about The Prestige. Check out the 3rd page for their thoughts on the book and the challenges in adapting it.
http://www.christophernolan.net/interviews_cs.php

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Christopher Priest:
There is hardly a line of dialogue or moment of action in the film that can be traced back word-for-word, yet the whole thing is faithful to the novel in spirit, in story and in effect. I have differences with the screenplay in places, but none of those detracts from my general impression that it is a classic film adaptation of an existing novel, one which intending screenwriters would do well to study alongside the novel.
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This Christopher Priest dude sounds like he's butthurt. What the Nolan brothers did was take something that was mediocre and turn it into an extraordinary piece of cinema. The Prestige is a fantastic example of the movie being far superior than the original text. I've read Priest's novel and it's nowhere near as interesting as Nolan's film adaptation.

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