Tag Archives: Paul Franklin

The 2011 Academy Awards Round-Up

Inception at the Academy Awards

I’m sure by now you all are familiar with the results of the 2011 Academy Awards. And you’re probably quite aware that Inception took home 4 Oscars this past Sunday night. It’s not breaking news, or news even, but we have to talk about it right? So we’ll try to make it interesting by including video clips and opinions. Let us remind you that Inception was nominated for a total of 8 Academy Awards. Quite famously none of those 8 were for Best Director. Here is what the nominations were for: Art Direction, Cinematography, Original Score, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, Visual Effects, Original Screenplay, and Best Picture. And here’s the breakdown of the half of those it did win.

First up, Best Achievement in Cinematography. Inception had just lost the first award of the night, Achievement in Art Direction, to Alice in Wonderland. Not the best sign for Inception‘s night it would seem. I personally thought it had a more than fair shot at winning in that category, but I’m often wrong about these things. Cinematographer Wally Pfister had some tough competition, among them the great Roger Deakins who has been nominated a total of 8 previous times without a win. But sure enough the prized golden statue went to 4 time nominee Wally Pfister! You can check out video of his acceptance speech later on in the article.

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by Teddy Blass
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Inception Earns 8 Oscar Nominations, Nolan Snubbed Again

Inception and 83rd Annual Academy Awards

Earlier this morning, the nominees for the 83rd annual Academy Awards were announced and Inception received a total of 8 nominations. Unlike 2 years ago, Christopher Nolan’s producing, and writing, were recognized by the academy. However, he was snubbed (again) in the Best Achievement in Directing category. It’s not too much of a surprise that there weren’t any acting nominations for the cast of the film either. Most of the nominees announced this morning were fairly predictable, no other major surprises or snubs. Here are the categories Inception was recognized for:

  • BEST PICTURE | Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas.
  • BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY | Christopher Nolan
  • BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY | Wally Pfister
  • BEST ORIGINAL SCORE | Hans Zimmer
  • BEST ART DIRECTION | Guy Hendrix Dyas, Larry Dias, Douglas A. Mowat
  • BEST SOUND MIXING | Lora Hirschberg, Gary Rizzo, Ed Novick
  • BEST SOUND EDITING | Richard King
  • BEST VISUAL EFFECTS | Chris Corbould, Andrew Lockley, Pete Bebb, Paul J. Franklin

Given the results of award shows like the Golden Globes and the PGA Awards, it seems things aren’t set in stone for any one film. What do you think Nolan and his collaborators on Inception have a shot at taking home on February 27th? Are there nominations not given that you would have like to seen? Share your thoughts below!

by Teddy Blass
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In Dreams: From the Page to the Screen

Inside the pages of the most recent Cinefex, a quarterly professional movie special effects magazine, writer Joe Fordham goes deeply into the production of Christopher Nolan’s latest thriller to explore the intensely complex visual and technical feats that carried Inception from Nolan’s dreams onto the big screen.

This article delves deep into the work done by special effects supervisor Chris Corbould, miniatures by New Deal Studio, and digital work by Double Negative, under the guidance of visual effects supervisor Paul Franklin.

Physical effects featured heavily during the inception – a bravura hour-and-20-minute action sequence in the second half of the film – where dreams within dreams create ripple effects of shifting equilibrium and weightlessness. […]

Shifting-gravity sets included giant gimbal rigs that production designer Guy Hendrix Dyas designed in collaboration with Chris Corbould’s team and stunt coordinator Tom Struthers. “One set was 100 feet long with corridors branching off it,” noted Corbould. “One minute a character would be walking along the floor with room off to the side, the next minute he’d be on the wall and the side corridor would turn into a 12-foot drop.”

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by Alex Haas
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