Have Your Thoughts On The Movie Changed Since Its Release?

The 2012 grand-scale epic about Batman's struggle to overcome the terrorist leader Bane, as well as his own inner demons.
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aside from it being a worthless piece of garbage cinema, and a general waste time and effort on the part of everyone involved in its production and for everyone involved with its viewership

it's the only Nolan film that I develop more and more appreciation for with every viewing

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Not as tight as TDK but overall I have found it to be far,far more enjoyable.

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I just completed my journey through all of the Nolan films again (in anticipation for Interstellar), and I still find TDKR to be an incredible film. I'm certainly not trying to start an argument, and I respect everyone's opinion....I'm just baffled by the negative reactions it has received since its release. That's just me, I guess.... :batman:

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Oldfriend wrote:I just completed my journey through all of the Nolan films again (in anticipation for Interstellar), and I still find TDKR to be an incredible film. I'm certainly not trying to start an argument, and I respect everyone's opinion....I'm just baffled by the negative reactions it has received since its release. That's just me, I guess.... :batman:
I did that about a month ago and I agree.

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Obviously this doesn't apply to anyone who genuinely didn't like the film (and has valid reasons), but I sort of got the impression (especially when lurking at various comic book forums) that bashing the film became the "cool" thing to do...it ended up spreading akin to the domino effect. Again, I'm not saying that applies to everyone who didn't like it. It's just a vibe I picked up on...maybe I'm imagining it. :?:

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My thoughts have slightly changed, only because time has dimmed the effect of the massive pre-release hype. I had never anticipated a film as much as TDKR and so when it was finally released, it never had a chance at living up to my expectations. Also, so much of the movie was teased and spoiled beforehand that it lacked the "surprise" effect of his other films.

With that, I was slightly disappointed afterwards because it wasn't as good as TDK. It was really really great, but not mind-blowing. Now that I've had more time to step away and admire the trilogy as a whole, it's garnered more appreciation in my mind. I still don't think it's the best of the trilogy, but it is an excellent third film and one of the best endings to any action trilogy. So even though I don't rank it as one of Nolan's masterpieces, it is just a notch below and still an incredible movie.

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I have a different view of the ending...
i used to have the conclusion that Bruce Wayne was alive like most everyone, but now I think he’s actually dead. I go back to Batman Begins and that very first conversation with Ras Al ghul, when he says to him “the world is too small for someone like Bruce Wayne to disappear, no matter how far he tries to sink” And where do we see the flying bat at the end? Over the bay, literally sinking. But what really lead me to believe this is a nugget that Nolan dropped himself when he Said he wrote the ending for Bruce Wayne when he was writing Batman Begins. So that makes sense that he would include that line in BB as foreshadowing for later. Now what we see in the actual film, in my opinion is Warner Bros telling Chris, hey please don’t kill Batman, that was probably the ONE condition they gave to him. So Chris low key had to make it ambiguous, and drop hints, and that’s also why we here Alfred talk about a fantasy he has about seeing Bruce Wayne, and it’s almost exactly like how he described it. The autopilot is irrelevant in my opinion, bc we never actually see him deploy it.

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It is overblown. As vast majority of the threequels are. But part of that has more to do with the fact that Nolan and his brother wanted to up the scale, thus they used the biggest Batman storylines for that - Knightfall & No Man's Land. Which ultimately led to movie's overblown story, since those comic book stories on their own are confusing and hard-to-follow, and when combined, it can become a true cluster of ideas. The movie was too big for its own good, and you can see that Nolan had hard time editing it, since he didn't even notice all those basic mistakes in the stunt work and bad extras, because of how much stuff there was put inside it. But then again, out of all superhero threequels that we got so far, it's still my favorite. I'll take it over Iron Man 3 or Thor Ragnarok any day of the week, even though it will take my a week to finish it.

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Frankthetank wrote:
May 14th, 2018, 1:39 pm
I have a different view of the ending...
i used to have the conclusion that Bruce Wayne was alive like most everyone, but now I think he’s actually dead. I go back to Batman Begins and that very first conversation with Ras Al ghul, when he says to him “the world is too small for someone like Bruce Wayne to disappear, no matter how far he tries to sink” And where do we see the flying bat at the end? Over the bay, literally sinking. But what really lead me to believe this is a nugget that Nolan dropped himself when he Said he wrote the ending for Bruce Wayne when he was writing Batman Begins. So that makes sense that he would include that line in BB as foreshadowing for later. Now what we see in the actual film, in my opinion is Warner Bros telling Chris, hey please don’t kill Batman, that was probably the ONE condition they gave to him. So Chris low key had to make it ambiguous, and drop hints, and that’s also why we here Alfred talk about a fantasy he has about seeing Bruce Wayne, and it’s almost exactly like how he described it. The autopilot is irrelevant in my opinion, bc we never actually see him deploy it.
Yeah, some of the stuff in the end definitely feels like it was mandated by the studio and wasn't proposed by Nolan himself. Like when Gordon sees flashback to Batman Begins after Batman reveals to him his identity. It's definitely was the studio that told him to put that because they thought, since Batman Begins wasn't popular when it came out, not a lot of people who will watch this movie will get the idea of what he's referring to. And Nolan would definitely leave the ending more ambiguous and would not show Bruce Wayne at the end. Which confuses me, since Nolan at that point have already proven himself to be the guy you can trust. I don't see why studio was putting notes on his desk.

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Batman's Batman wrote:
June 8th, 2018, 1:17 pm
Frankthetank wrote:
May 14th, 2018, 1:39 pm
I have a different view of the ending...
i used to have the conclusion that Bruce Wayne was alive like most everyone, but now I think he’s actually dead. I go back to Batman Begins and that very first conversation with Ras Al ghul, when he says to him “the world is too small for someone like Bruce Wayne to disappear, no matter how far he tries to sink” And where do we see the flying bat at the end? Over the bay, literally sinking. But what really lead me to believe this is a nugget that Nolan dropped himself when he Said he wrote the ending for Bruce Wayne when he was writing Batman Begins. So that makes sense that he would include that line in BB as foreshadowing for later. Now what we see in the actual film, in my opinion is Warner Bros telling Chris, hey please don’t kill Batman, that was probably the ONE condition they gave to him. So Chris low key had to make it ambiguous, and drop hints, and that’s also why we here Alfred talk about a fantasy he has about seeing Bruce Wayne, and it’s almost exactly like how he described it. The autopilot is irrelevant in my opinion, bc we never actually see him deploy it.
Yeah, some of the stuff in the end definitely feels like it was mandated by the studio and wasn't proposed by Nolan himself. Like when Gordon sees flashback to Batman Begins after Batman reveals to him his identity. It's definitely was the studio that told him to put that because they thought, since Batman Begins wasn't popular when it came out, not a lot of people who will watch this movie will get the idea of what he's referring to. And Nolan would definitely leave the ending more ambiguous and would not show Bruce Wayne at the end. Which confuses me, since Nolan at that point have already proven himself to be the guy you can trust. I don't see why studio was putting notes on his desk.
I'm not saying you're right or wrong on this, but since you think that do you think that the studio also asked for the flashes of Gordon seeing Dent holding his son hostage in the beginning of TDKR at: "The truth..." ? Do you also think that the producers asked him to do this in BB when Bruce looks at the stethoscope (I believe on two separate occasions) and shows a shot of young Bruce with his father? I wouldn't be surprised if they did, but Nolan has done things like that before.

I know it's a bit on the nose, but I kind of like it too. It also shows how much Gordon had aged since then and that he really was that hero. It's okay to spoon feed that a little bit. As evidenced by box office and home video sales, literally not everyone has seen Batman Begins, and even if they had it really is a small event in the film that you aren't triggered to thinking about so much later in the trilogy.

As for showing Bruce at the end or not, I've thought up four different ways they could have decided to shoot parts of this film:

1) Original way... when Alfred explains his Italian restaurant fantasy, we get a visual of him being there and seeing somebody not named Bruce. At the end of the film, we actually get a shot of Bruce.

2) When Alfred explains his Italian restaurant fantasy, we get a visual of him being there and seeing somebody not named Bruce. At the end of the film, we get no shot of Bruce, and only see Alfred looking at somebody who is likely supposed to be Bruce (but hey who knows maybe it's just winking at the audience).

3) When Alfred explains his Italian restaurant fantasy, we do not see the visual alongside it and stay in the Batcave. At the end of the film, we actually get a shot of Bruce.

4) When Alfred explains his Italian restaurant fantasy, we do not see the visual alongside it and stay in the Batcave. At the end of the film, we get no shot of Bruce, and only see Alfred looking at somebody who is likely supposed to be Bruce.

I actually prefer option #3 the most I think. If there's something they should not have shown, it's the restaurant scenario in his fantasy. Because the problem is the second we see it at the end, we know what it's about. We've already been there before. At least the other way we can get a slow build-up of: "Ooh, is that... could it be... would that mean... OHMYGOSH!" kind of surprise. As Kevin Smith calls this beat the Good Will Hunting moment, the same kind of thing that happens in that film would seem stupid if we saw a visual of what Ben Affleck's character was explaining to Damon's character as it happened. Same thing here.

The one thing I would possibly change is have Bruce look a little different. Maybe have more of the Terminator Salvation look. At least then he's making the slightest attempt of looking different lol.

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