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Christopher Nolan's action triller about the WWII story commonly known as The Miracle at Dunkirk. July 21, 2017.

Dunkirk Nolan Fans Member Reviews (NFometer)

Posts: 458
Location: San Bruno, CA
Things I realized upon my second viewing:

- Dude on the beach who says that the little platform they made when the tide was coming in, then when it's used as the tide was high you saw a smirk on his face like he was impressed with himself.

- George stating he was hoping to make a name for himself in the local paper. I'm sure I heard it the first time, but after seeing the end the first time then connecting it with the words this time, I liked the foreshadowing.

- Really looked harder at Alex's development by the end of the film when he was almost incredibly humiliated returning home. Snubbed himself to the blind man (Alex didn't even realize he was blind, he just thought that the guy was ashamed of looking at him), couldn't bear to read Churchill's statement or look out the train window upon returning, etc. Felt really good for him being redeemed in the end by his countrymates.

- I don't know why, but the first time with the timeline jumping I thought the people ditching the bluish boat and swimming away were the Dutchmen because they thought they were hitting shore (and couldn't make out why it was sinking and then later washed upright later for the boys). I then realized that was the boys near the end of the film, and they just showed a later timeline sequence very early on. I know I'm not typing these words out very well as I'm saying them, heh.

- That score, man. I don't think it stopped until Tommy closed his eyes on the train... or at least it might have been the first time since the beginning of the film where there was no noise whatsoever. I also like how the score would sometimes blend into whatever sound effect was coming on screen, specifically the violins going into the sounds of the planes. Very wild.

- Cillian Murphy's character actually sees someone carried off the Moonstone on a stretcher, and puts two-and-two together and realizes that he actually had killed George.

- Per the movie's take, I don't think any severely wounded soldiers not still on the beach prior to the civilian evacuations survived, beginning with the first ship that sank near the beginning of the film.
Posts: 329
Second viewing. Still a masterpiece, despite I enjoyed it more the first time simply because I had gone blind into the movie. And anyway rewatchability is not a major indicator of quality for me.

This was the most complex ending sequence of any Nolan film by far.
He walks a very tightrope between two emotions. One being the very optimistic Churchill speech and the other being having the audience in knots regarding Hardy's fate. But both linked by the uncertain future of the war ahead. I can't pinpoint exactly why but last shot just felt perfect.
Also I am realizing so many Nolan lovers(people on my FB feed) appreciated him for his plots more than anything else. Man comes out with a perfect example of white knuckle filmmaking and people are scratching their heads as to why the film is getting stellar reviews.

One thing I noticed the second time.
When Farrier loses contact with Collins, suddenly he waves his hands towards the sea where Collin's plane had crash landed. Later on when Collins was trying to come out and was moving his hand frantically, Hardy had mistook the signal as him being fine.
A question though.
The time line at the beginning specifies one week for the mole but wasn't the action set over a period of 2 days only?
Posts: 458
Location: San Bruno, CA
spade wrote:One thing I noticed the second time.
When Farrier loses contact with Collins, suddenly he waves his hands towards the sea where Collin's plane had crash landed. Later on when Collins was trying to come out and was moving his hand frantically, Hardy had mistook the signal as him being fine.

Fuck, I meant to include that in the things that I noticed! My list just became so jumbled that obviously I lost track of it. Thanks for including it.


spade wrote:A question though.
The time line at the beginning specifies one week for the mole but wasn't the action set over a period of 2 days only?

See my Dunkirk Timeline thread where it's being discussed.
Posts: 450
Location: Arkham
As it stands now, this film is second only to The Dark Knight in Nolan's filmography, and it's damn near his most accomplished, awe inspiring effort yet, in which his best characteristics as a filmmaker shine bright, and his faults are diminished. Merciless, harrowing, yet inspiring in the same breath. 9/10.

May give more in-depth thoughts later.

:gonf: :gonf:
Posts: 763
Location: Norway
Had my first viewing today. I was planning on doing a bigger writeup as my review, but I figured most things have been said already so I'll keep it relatively short. (edit: nope, i lied)

First of all the visuals and technical aspects are absolutely stunning. Knowing how everything was shot with basically no CGI and how difficult that must have been really enhanced my experience. Sure Deakins is long overdue for a DP win, but Hoyte definitely deserves to win for this. I don't see how 2049 can be any better.

Secondly, almost half the way through (at least 45 minutes) I started thinking about how some people were kinda disappointed and underwhelmed after their first viewing, and I worried I was going to end up as one of them. Outside of the amazing images I was watching, I didn't feel anything yet. Music was repetitive, the dialouge was extremely minimal and I didn't feel like the story was going anywhere. I was afraid that I had been hyping it up way too much for myself.

But then it just kept on giving. The score became more insane, and I got way more invested in both the story and the characters. The suspense was absolutely insane, and I totally get that part about forgetting to breathe. The final 30 minutes or so is some of (if not) the greatest piece of cinema I've ever witnessed. It was like the Interstellar docking scene just even crazier and longer. Some of the aerial shots were completely breathtaking, and the ending was beautiful. And don't get me started on the whole sound experience.

Looking at the whole movie I still think Memento, The Prestige, The Dark Knight and Inception are better put together, and their screenplays are stronger. But I have to give Nolan major props for what he did with Dunkirk. It's incredible that he managed to put all of this together, and technically speaking it's by far his best work.

9.5/10
Posts: 2345
I saw it my second time tonight, I think in laser IMAX since the aspect ratio was nearly as tall as IMAX 15/70 film.

Here is what I watched for and spotted this time, what I still missed, and what I wondered about:
http://www.nolanfans.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=45&t=30059&p=1126161#p1126161

Sticking with my 9/10 rating for now mainly because I think some of these things shouldn't have been so easily missable first time around.

Note - this was a Monday night in a small town IMAX. Earlier in the day I reserved the 7th reserved seat. I would say another 6-10 people were walkins, so max maybe 17 people in the cinema. This was a 5PM weeknight showing (I had to leave work early to see that show).
Posts: 68
Saw Dunkirk Yesterday with my wife both absolutely loved it, what a ride this movie was..I loved in particular the cinematography..just some amazing shots by Hoyte..nolan's direction and pacing to me was great along with zimmers score which wasn't his greatest imo, but suited the film well.
Acting was actually very good , I thought Rylance was the standout in the movie along with Brannagh and Hardy.. the young fella's were good..whitehead, styles etc all held their own. I wish the movie was bit longer, maybe 2 hours would've been nice, I thought it was a little rushed here and there but i guess thats what nolan was going for..fuck it had me sweating. Those dog fights were brilliant so realistic..can't wait to see it a second and third time in theaters. I was at a 2;25 afternoon show here in Victoria, Canada and the theater was packed, I was at the top of the theater and just a sea of grey hair below..just a minor applause at the end. 9.5/10....my top5 nolan movies are Interstellar..Dunkirk..Inception..The Dark Knight..BB.. :clap: :clap: :gonf: :gonf:
Posts: 937
Just saw it, pretty good. Not sure if the structure was particularly necessary though. 8/10.

On another note, this movie, and to a lesser extent interstellar and tdkr has made me less certain about whether Nolan is a better writer than director.
Posts: 329
MeLVaNoaTe wrote:Just saw it, pretty good. Not sure if the structure was particularly necessary though. 8/10.

Why? I thought it made complete sense. Rather it felt totally natural considering the story that is being told here.
Posts: 458
Location: San Bruno, CA
spade wrote:
MeLVaNoaTe wrote:Just saw it, pretty good. Not sure if the structure was particularly necessary though. 8/10.

Why? I thought it made complete sense. Rather it felt totally natural considering the story that is being told here.

I don't think "natural" is the word you want to point to, here. It's not natural like it is in Memento, where the story is told backwards so that the audience can experience Leonard's condition... or in The Prestige, where Borden and Angier are reading each other's diaries and we flash back to those reminiscent moments.

For the sake of the film's pacing though, it was entirely necessary. That much I can agree with.
Last edited by MuffinMcFluffin on July 24th, 2017, 11:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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