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Christopher Nolan's action triller about the WWII story commonly known as The Miracle at Dunkirk. July 21, 2017.

Dunkirk Nolan Fans Member Reviews (NFometer)

Posts: 26
I've just come back from a 70mm showing at the Cinerama in Seattle.
This has got to be my favorite camera and sound work from any Christopher Nolan film, ever.
As a slight historian and an especially big fan of WWII films, this film delivered on every aspect that it attempted.
Loud, beautifully shot, incredibly acted, amazing visuals and shot coordination, I cant wait to see Dunkirk in IMAX in the coming days.
Just beautiful.
Posts: 15994
Location: North Carolina
saw it again, but not in 70mm

i still love it of course, so so much, but seeing it in 70 really makes it pop. no discredit to the movie itself.

my two friends said it was a 7/10 and now theyre not my friends
Posts: 458
Location: San Bruno, CA
TehBatGetsBraked wrote:saw it again, but not in 70mm

i still love it of course, so so much, but seeing it in 70 really makes it pop. no discredit to the movie itself.

my two friends said it was a 7/10 and now theyre not my friends

I hope you're being sarcastic, even if they gave it a 0/10.
Posts: 15994
Location: North Carolina
MuffinMcFluffin wrote:
TehBatGetsBraked wrote:saw it again, but not in 70mm

i still love it of course, so so much, but seeing it in 70 really makes it pop. no discredit to the movie itself.

my two friends said it was a 7/10 and now theyre not my friends

I hope you're being sarcastic, even if they gave it a 0/10.

nah they my boys even if they have bad opinions
Posts: 26
Saw the film in IMAX 70mm and this is exactly how it should be viewed. Nolan provides once again one of the best movie going experiences one could ever get out of going to the movies. The crisp and clear visuals sucked the audience into the movie and made it feel like we were there with the characters. Every time guns were shot, it felt like I was being shot at. Bombs being drop made you feel the shockwaves, due to the amount of bass and thanks to the IMAX theater speakers. Ingenius work with the sound design.

The decision to not focus on characters made the feel of war THAT much more authentic, although Hardy's character was the most badass.

It's quite ironic that things like 3D and CGI are supposed to make cinema more immersive. But my most immersive movie experience was experienced just a few hours ago with Dunkirk. The high resolution IMAX, the great cinematography, the fantastic sound design and soundtrack - all melded together cohesively truly made me feel like I was there on the beach, there in the water and there in the air.

I would not say this is my favorite Nolan film. However, Dunkirk in IMAX 70mm was hands down the best movie-going experience I have ever had in my 29 years of life.

I want to add, that for this PG-13 rated movie. Nolan decided to set a limitation on himself and he succeeded very damn well. War movies often times rely on depicting gore and violence for shock factor, There is no gore and no blood even within the movie(or at least very little). However, there are multiple scenes where he draws the picture, but leaves the audience to color it in with our imaginations. Nolan's way of drawing out the terrors of war is truly masterful and even more effective than the norm. For example:
the scene where british soldiers are jumping out of the boat and the boat is drifting to a close against another boat, Nolan shows one soldier narrowly making it to safety. Then he decides to cut and pan out showing the boat closing the gap and all you hear is the terrible cry of a soldier getting crushed. It was very terrifying.


Nolan really accentuated the feeling of tension throughout the entire film and his masterful allusion to horrific moments was well executed. Which leads me to call it... his next film venture will be a mystery/thriller/horror.
Last edited by BETA. on July 22nd, 2017, 12:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
Posts: 133
BETA. wrote:Saw the film in IMAX 70mm and this is exactly how it should be viewed. Nolan provides once again one of the best movie going experiences one could ever get out of going to the movies. The crisp and clear visuals sucked the audience into the movie and made it feel like we were there with the characters. Every time guns were shot, it felt like I was being shot at. Bombs being drop made you feel the shockwaves, due to the amount of bass and thanks to the IMAX theater speakers. Ingenius work with the sound design.

The decision to not focus on characters made the feel of war THAT much more authentic, although Hardy's character was the most badass.

It's quite ironic that things like 3D and CGI are supposed to make cinema more immersive. But my most immersive movie experience was experienced just a few hours ago with Dunkirk. The high resolution IMAX, the great cinematography, the fantastic sound design and soundtrack - all melded together cohesively truly made me feel like I was there on the beach, there in the water and there in the air.

I would not say this is my favorite Nolan film. However, Dunkirk in IMAX 70mm was hands down the best movie-going experience I have ever had in my 29 years of life.

I want to add, that for this PG-13 rated movie. Nolan decided to set a limitation on himself and he succeeded very damn well. War movies often times rely on depicting gore and violence for shock factor, There is no gore and no blood even within the movie(or at least very little). However, there are multiple scenes where he draws the picture, but leaves the audience to color it in with our imaginations. Nolan's way of drawing out the terrors of war is truly masterful and even more effective than the norm. For example:
the scene where british soldiers are jumping out of the boat and the boat is drifting to a close against another boat, Nolan shows one soldier narrowly making it to safety. Then he decides to cut and pan out showing the boat closing the gap and all you hear is the terrible cry of a soldier getting crushed. It was very terrifying.

Agreed
Posts: 24213
Location: A deep, dark pit of cynicism
It's essentially a one-act film. It's the Fury Road of 2017. It's like one extended parallel action sequence from a typical Nolan film. Sound design and effects were just shockingly good. Anything involving planes got a big internal scream from me.

Rylance made me cry. Seems like the only real contender for performance accolades. Everyone else is great, but the film doesn't necessarily lend itself to putting a spotlight on the performances.

I'd say the only major issue I have with the flick is that it took me a while to get really hooked. I think this is largely due to how it starts virtually in medias res and kind of stays that way until the end. I don't think many directors can really pull that off well. Nolan manages to do it. I suppose I just wish I was engaged from the very beginning, which was what the film was clearly going for.

It lacks the level of ambition that Interstellar and TDKR have, but Dunkirk has an appropriately smaller scope than those films. It's delivered fantastically.

It's a masterful work and perhaps Nolan's most technically efficient film to date. I'm really impressed with the fact Nolan has actually managed to get better after making a series of what seemed like increasingly messy films.

9/10


My current ranking of the Nolanography:

1. The Prestige
2. Interstellar
3. Dunkirk
4. The Dark Knight Rises
5. The Dark Knight
6. Inception
7. Batman Begins
8. Insomnia
9. Memento
10. Following
Posts: 11
Location: Sydney, Australia
With Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan has found the perfect balance between ambition and execution. Throughout Nolan's films, the conflict between execution and ambition has reigned on, finding harmony on only a few of Nolan's films, most elegantly in Inception and The Prestige. Dunkirk is ambitious in its visual story telling, non-linear timelines, continuous tension and short running time but also executed well in its ability to balance emotion, grit and tension without faltering for the entire 2 hours.

It's easy to say a movie has 'visual story telling' just because there is minimal dialogue but Nolan shows the craft required to execute such a concept with true visual poetry. The film takes a risk in not showing the enemies. They cannot be seen. They cannot be heard. The dread they induce is solely by the construction of destruction Nolan captures with the aid of the stunning shots and camerawork by cinematographer Hoyte Van Hoytema and the eerie, off-kilter string-infused ticking score by Hans Zimmer.


Nolan has managed to create characters defined, not by their backstories, not by their idiosyncrasies, but purely as a product of their environment. In Dunkirk, Nolan does away with the pronounced sentimentality that he used in Interstellar. There's no great speeches given by characters. There's no flagrant moments of heroism. Instead, there are small, poignant moments, reflecting larger ideas of how one's convictions can change through survival in adversity.
Posts: 10158
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£
Posts: 15994
Location: North Carolina
virgo i'm a boner/10

which means 9.5/10
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