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Christopher Nolan's action triller about the WWII story commonly known as The Miracle at Dunkirk. July 21, 2017.

Dunkirk Industry/Celebrity Buzz

Posts: 2373
Not a positive buzz but... interview in GQ with J.J. Redick of the Philadelphia 76er's
https://www.gq.com/story/jj-redick-2017 ... -interview

Excerpt

Another interest you have is movies, especially Christopher Nolan films, but I saw on Twitter you didn’t really enjoy Dunkirk.

Reddick: I’m a Christopher Nolan fiend. I love Inception, Interstellar, The Prestige, Memento and of course the Batman trilogy. I love all his movies. I don’t think the meta [story] of Dunkirk was like over my head. I get what he was trying to get across. I just didn’t enjoy it. It wasn’t an enjoyable movie. It was boring. I don’t know how anyone can sit through that and be like, ‘Oh my god, what an awesome film.’ There was no emotional attachment to anything. The story of World War II, it touches people, but as a movie, it was missing something.

We should clarify for the One Direction fans that you did say Harry Styles was the best part of the movie.

Reddick: Harry Styles was amazing, So, Ben Winston [executive producer of The Late, Late Show with James Corden] is one of my best friends. He’s a great mate of mine and I’ve had many Shabbat dinners with him. I actually had a Shabbat dinner with Ben and Harry last season. Harry had just finished filming part of Dunkirk and was getting ready to go back to finish filming. I was just shocked at how down to earth he was. He’s a hell of a human being. He really is just a kind, good hearted person.
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Location: Poland
I'm mostly with JJ on this but you can still admire the technical mastery at work with Dunkirk.
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Location: Canada
Thanks for thread bump dormouse7. I bookmarked this a while back, I meant to post it here but kinda forgot to. In an interview, Richard Armitage talks a bit about Dunkirk.

Yeah and that’s a debate that many people have. I usually mention Saving Private Ryan and the World War II veterans who watched it and said it felt like they were back there. But then Dunkirk came out and wasn’t as gory as Saving Private Ryan but veterans still felt like they were back there as well. So it’s just based on how you make the film right?

[Richard Armitage] Yeah and I also think that as you take a viewer through this world there’s a debate to be had about when we’re faced with that extreme violence do we really see it. Or does our natural instinct make us look away. How much do we really face? In Dunkirk some of those shots where the bodies are exploding right in front of us, it’s almost blurred in the foreground. The brain and eye can only take so much, which I believe. The brain and the eye are very clever as they shield us from a lot of things.

So I’m guessing you did like Dunkirk then?

[Richard Armitage] I loved it. It’s my film of the decade. The thing I loved so much about Dunkirk was the sound design. The sound design is extraordinary and I’m guessing it’s going to win a lot of awards.


https://getreelmovies.com/richard-armit ... ilgrimage/
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Location: Canada


Starts talking about Dunkirk at the 35 second mark.
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http://variety.com/2017/film/news/chris ... 202607836/
Paul Thomas Anderson, the director of “The Master” and “There Will Be Blood” and an admirer of “Dunkirk,” hails the film’s economical quality. He notes that there’s very little dialogue, which contributes to its power. “Its practically wordless structure was so exciting to me,” Anderson tells Variety. “It’s stripped down to bare essentials.”
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Indiewire: Paul Thomas Anderson is a Big ‘Dunkirk’ Fan: ‘Its Wordless Structure Was So Exciting to Me’
http://www.indiewire.com/2017/11/paul-t ... 201895120/

Excerpt:
Anderson is one of many directors who have singled out “Dunkirk” as a favorite from 2017. Filmmakers Edgar Wright and Rian Johnson posted rave reviews of the movie on Twitter in July. Wright called it a “powerful, immersive, intense masterpiece that demands it be seen on the big screen,” while Johnson called it an “all-timer.”
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Location: On NolanFans, aren't I?
cooldude wrote:

Starts talking about Dunkirk at the 35 second mark.

I love Oldman to death but the people behind this film have gone from mimicking Dunkirk in advertising to basically trying to say it's a companion piece when it's not.

Also PTA loves Nolan from my knowledge so it's cool to read about his thoughts.
Posts: 3388
Location: Canada
Ehh, most of the reviews I read explicitly say that it’s a companion piece to Dunkirk. The similarities between the two are quite obvious, I don’t see a problem with addressing that. And it’s probably been brought up way more by the interviewer than the Darkest Hour folks, again, the similarities would be hard to ignore.
Posts: 22817
Location: On NolanFans, aren't I?
I just usually hear "companion piece" as a piece that benefits from the other. Dunkirk was specifically crafted in the idea to not include the type of scenes or settings that Darkest Hour revolves around and I feel like that is how the film is supposed to be viewed. As a standalone piece.

I would feel the same probably once watching Darkest Hour, honestly.
Posts: 3388
Location: Canada
That's reasonable. The viewpoint I got from the reviews was both films complement each other. As Gary Oldman said, you find stuff not included in one film in the other and vice-versa. That's why I assumed the word 'companion' gets thrown around. I don't think that takes away from them being standalone films. They're still very individualistic.
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