Dunkirk's Soundtrack

Christopher Nolan's action triller about the WWII story commonly known as The Miracle at Dunkirk. July 21, 2017.
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OVERMAN wrote:I know Nolan probably told Hans: Listen I don't want it to sound Spielbergian, which is good, but you kind of expect Zimmer's initiative to be something like: "Hey, I want to use church organs for your space movie how about that!" not: "lend me your watch, I'll come up with something later"
The organ was Nolan's idea BTW. The stopwatch might be his idea too.
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Look, some listened to this track expecting to get a melodic theme. This track was obviously written for an ACTION sequence. Now, some are judging the whole score on one cue! It's like judging Interstellar based on "Imperfect Lock" which is also a repetitive cue, but it's a brilliant cue because it builds tension and THAT IS THE POINT that some are missing.

Some need to open their horizon a bit, Zimmer can make more classical/conventional scores, but it seems like if he has the freedom to do whatever he wants, he's gonna go in a direction that some won't like. Combine that with Nolan's intent and you get this kind of music. Zimmer proved that a film score isn't just notes and chords, it can also be a world of different sounds that accompany the visuals.

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I love it

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The stopwatch was Nolan's idea. He sent a recording of his pocket watch to Hans.

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Bacon wrote:The stopwatch was Nolan's idea. He sent a recording of his pocket watch to Hans.
Genius

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AhmadAli95 wrote: Look, some listened to this track expecting to get a melodic theme. This track was obviously written for an ACTION sequence. Now, some are judging the whole score on one cue! It's like judging Interstellar based on "Imperfect Lock" which is also a repetitive cue, but it's a brilliant cue because it builds tension and THAT IS THE POINT that some are missing.



Some need to open their horizon a bit, Zimmer can make more classical/conventional scores, but it seems like if he has the freedom to do whatever he wants, he's gonna go in a direction that some won't like. Combine that with Nolan's intent and you get this kind of music. Zimmer proved that a film score isn't just notes and chords, it can also be a world of different sounds that accompany the visuals.
Wasn't trying to judge the entire score but the characteristics of that single track and the fact that up until this day (less than a month from release) I haven't heard something that resembles a main theme from the movie, melodic or not, something that helps it stand on it's own, so either it's simply the ticking clock from the music track and prologue which I personally find underwhelming or there is something much better that's been omitted from the marketing campaign, and I really hope that's the case.

You say Supermarine is only representative of an action scene but the way Nolan and other people describe the picture, it's safe to say he intends the movie to feel as one big action sequence, or something like a singular set piece told in three different points of view that undergo constant ACTION, happening in real time. If you can also notice the obvious similarities to other Zimmer scores, the simple pace alteration from what we saw during the prologue's repeating cue and see this is as something probably intended not as a separate action track but part of that unified action piece, doesn't that tell you I would actually need something else to "open my horizon a bit"?. To me, even if Zimmer had the freedom to do whatever he wants he just felt comfortable with what he's done in the past because as I said the music and particularly the intention sound way too familiar.

That been said we have a good director and a good composer, even if I don't feel an identity on what I've heard so far this kind of music does sound very "Nolanish" and very "Zimmerish" and it will serve the purpose of the movie but the reason Inception's score, as well as Interstellar's and TDKT scores resonate so well with people is not only because they serve the purpose of the movie but because they are utilized so well, they pretty much bring you back to very specific moments, feelings, actions, performances, dialogues, images, etc. So that's just some food for thought, perhaps after a couple moths in the future, once the dust settles.

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Whatever the context of this piece of music is, it doesn't change that it's 8 minutes of derivative monotony that sounds more like something you'd get from Hans working with Zack Snyder. But, each soundtrack from Hans has a few mediocre or bad tracks, hopefully this isn't representative of the rest of the score.

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The track sets off my imagination of what the scene's going to be like. And i love it for that.

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OVERMAN wrote:
AhmadAli95 wrote:
Look, some listened to this track expecting to get a melodic theme. This track was obviously written for an ACTION sequence. Now, some are judging the whole score on one cue! It's like judging Interstellar based on "Imperfect Lock" which is also a repetitive cue, but it's a brilliant cue because it builds tension and THAT IS THE POINT that some are missing.



Some need to open their horizon a bit, Zimmer can make more classical/conventional scores, but it seems like if he has the freedom to do whatever he wants, he's gonna go in a direction that some won't like. Combine that with Nolan's intent and you get this kind of music. Zimmer proved that a film score isn't just notes and chords, it can also be a world of different sounds that accompany the visuals.
Wasn't trying to judge the entire score but the characteristics of that single track and the fact that up until this day (less than a month from release) I haven't heard something that resembles a main theme from the movie, melodic or not, something that helps it stand on it's own, so either it's simply the ticking clock from the music track and prologue which I personally find underwhelming or there is something much better that's been omitted from the marketing campaign, and I really hope that's the case.

You say Supermarine is only representative of an action scene but the way Nolan and other people describe the picture, it's safe to say he intends the movie to feel as one big action sequence, or something like a singular set piece told in three different points of view that undergo constant ACTION, happening in real time. If you can also notice the obvious similarities to other Zimmer scores, the simple pace alteration from what we saw during the prologue's repeating cue and see this is as something probably intended not as a separate action track but part of that unified action piece, doesn't that tell you I would actually need something else to "open my horizon a bit"?. To me, even if Zimmer had the freedom to do whatever he wants he just felt comfortable with what he's done in the past because as I said the music and particularly the intention sound way too familiar.

That been said we have a good director and a good composer, even if I don't feel an identity on what I've heard so far this kind of music does sound very "Nolanish" and very "Zimmerish" and it will serve the purpose of the movie but the reason Inception's score, as well as Interstellar's and TDKT scores resonate so well with people is not only because they serve the purpose of the movie but because they are utilized so well, they pretty much bring you back to very specific moments, feelings, actions, performances, dialogues, images, etc. So that's just some food for thought, perhaps after a couple moths in the future, once the dust settles.
I didn't make it clear that I wasn't directing all that talk to you specifically.

We didn't expect them to give us anything from the score in the first place. Supermarine is just a tease/a taste of the score. I was gonna say that the movie seems to be one long action sequence but of course there'll me some small breaks here and there (judging from some shots in the trailers).

I think what he's done with stopwatches and synths is quite remarkable. The music from the prologue might have been underwhelming to you but it's has been looping in my head since December, so I think it was utilized well.
The thing is, film music shouldn't be made to please listeners so it resonating with people outside of the movie experience is not something you think of when you score a movie. It has to serve movie first and foremost. The fact that Inception & Interstellar did doesn't mean Dunkirk has to do that as well. But it seems like it is actually doing so because a lot of people praised the music from the prologue and would listen to it when it's out and most people enjoyed Supermarine quite a bit, so I'm not worried at all.

*Spoiler tags are used so the quotes don't take too much space.

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Why so?

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