528491!!

This 2010 contemporary sci-fi actioner follows a subconscious security team around the globe and into the intimate and infinite world of dreams.
Posts: 18
Joined: July 2010
Yeah, I really have to see it one more time and listen and look more for 528 and 491 (not 419, mistake earlier).

My theory about Inception is that while there are many interpretations, and ample evidence to support each and every one of them, my final conclusion is that it's a really a simply story that becomes amazingly complex in people's minds.

Cobb is a regular guy with 2 kids who is coming home from a business trip on a plane. His wife suffered from a mental illness, Cobb took her to 3 psychiatrists to try and get her help, but in the end she lost her mind, trashed their hotel room on their anniversary and threw herself off the building and killed herself which why she is so prominent in the entire movie. The movie starts when Cobb gets on the plane to go home. A big guy in first class (Eames) bumps Fischer and knocks his passport loose and it is given to Cobb. When Cobb sees the passport, he realizes who Fischer is and feeling sympathetic to Fischer he buys Fischer a drink and toasts his dad. Then he falls asleep on the plane.

Everything from the first scene with Saito to the last scene with Saito as an old man takes place entirely in Cobb's mind, with the one exception of getting on the plane, which was real) When Cobb finally wakes up on the plane, he's still on the plane and back in reality.

The thing that throws everyone for a loop is the spinning top, but the biggest clue isn't the top, it's the TRAIN.

The night that Mal kills herself she talks about "the train that will take them to where they want to go "and it's the last thing she says before she jumps to her death. This is the reason that Cobb says he hates trains, and he has a damn good reason. It's also a symbol for where he wanted to go: He wanted to die with her, not her first. This is the reason they are both on the tracks together about to die, and the reason he built everything in Limbo is because that's what he wanted to do. In his dreams they did grow old together, but he struggles with the image of her all through the dream is because that's the only place she now exists and she keeps interfering in everything because the dream is Cobb's dream and all the other characters are projections of Cobb's mind. He's trying to tell himself that they aren't real. This is why the train slams down the street trying to kill everyone.

In the end the entire dream is a struggle between Mal trying to tell Cobb that the dream is real and him trying to keep him asleep wake up vs. the image of his kids, who's faces he can't see because he is dreaming and they aren't real. When Cobb wakes up, the people in the whole dream were just the people sitting in first class, everything is normal at the airport and when he gets home and sees his kids he really is home.

That's pretty much it. It's a love story.

Louis

Posts: 25653
Joined: February 2010
Location: Tejas
You guys are insane.

sin
Posts: 5
Joined: July 2010
for those wanting clarification on the numbers in regard to the hotel rooms

528 is the room where they are hiding the bodies

491 is where ariadne and arthur go to plant the explosives while cobb is distracting fischer

when they enter 491 arthur specifically says 528 is the room above this right?
so the original idea was to blow up the lower level so that the top room would drop down creating a kick due to free fall.
and thats why he exits the room as soon as they drop to level 3. he has to distract the guards and lead them away from the bodies (he says something about "and i will lead them on a merry chase")

but since they missed the van kick from hitting the bridge he had to improvise and make a new kick

but yeah those are the numbers in regard to the hotel room

Posts: 17
Joined: July 2010
Im already considering a tattoo involving Mals totem and the numbers...and we will see what else I can come up with, my left upper arm is dedicated to tattoos involving nolans films, because he is the only real mastermind in film right now and i love his brain.

Posts: 17
Joined: July 2010
I would also like to say in response to lsc9x's theory that it is a bit coincidental that fischer's first defense against extraction is a train.....possibly too coincidental but who knows, and nolan must be a fan of lost, yet you have to believe nolan liked lost but not enough and wanted to make his own version of a crazy ass story like lost with infinite explanations and theories

Posts: 37
Joined: July 2010
PoRTaLFieLD wrote:I would also like to say in response to lsc9x's theory that it is a bit coincidental that fischer's first defense against extraction is a train.....possibly too coincidental but who knows, and nolan must be a fan of lost, yet you have to believe nolan liked lost but not enough and wanted to make his own version of a crazy ass story like lost with infinite explanations and theories
The train in level 1 (van scene) was from Cobb's subconscious. It was Mal 'breaking through'. Ariadne yells at Cobb about the train in the warehouse after Saito is shot and before they take off in the van. The train is from Cobb and Mal's 50 year limbo when they finally escaped by having it squish their heads. It's also seen in Cobb's 'elevator of memories' when Ariadne is heading down to the basement level.

Posts: 25653
Joined: February 2010
Location: Tejas
You guys are ridiculous.

Why are you obsessing? Is it rewarding you any value? I mean, hey :roll:, if it is then I'd like to join too.

Posts: 18
Joined: July 2010
I am going to watch the movie again tomorrow and I'm going to pay close attention to the plane tickets that Cobb is given in the dream by the guy in his house telling him to go and the room number of the hotel that Mal trashed before she jumps from the building and kills herself.

If the number on the hotel room of the dream heist matches the one in the trashed hotel room and the flight number is the other 3 digits then the only person who would have all 6 numbers is Cobb which means they are his projection into the dream and not coming from Fischer.

We'll see...

Posts: 18
Joined: July 2010
Cilogy wrote:You guys are ridiculous.

Why are you obsessing? Is it rewarding you any value? I mean, hey :roll:, if it is then I'd like to join too.
Actually there is. Do you want to think that Inception is a good movie or a great one? Do you care about having emotions about a film? Or about the characters in it?

To me, the best movies are the ones that make you FEEL something. Sadness, happiness, love, etc. If a movie can make you cry at the end because it was so damn good (like "Saving Private Ryan" did for me) then you know it's really, really good.

I knew that Inception was a great movie and well done, but I personally really wanted to know EXACTLY what the movie was about (and a lot of it was unclear on the first viewing) and the biggest thing that kept bugging me is that no matter how I put the pieces together it just didn't completely make sense to me. Something about Mal kept nagging at me as well as some of the concepts people were coming up with. Something was telling me that there was more to this story than trying to break into Fishcer's mind, and I think I have finally "got it".

The reward is that when you realize that it's a LOVE story about a regular dude (Cobb) who's wife (Mal) killed herself, it becomes an emotional movie, and not just a mental one.

When that idea hit me, and I realized that this was really a love story, and that the entire dream heist took place in Cobb's head, then it really made me care about Cobb a whole lot more and it made the ending a really happy one instead of an ambiguous one.

The real story is absurdly simple: Cobb is just a businessman coming home from a trip who wants to get home to see his kids. After buying Robert Fischer Jr a drink to toast Robert's late father (out of sympathy, not to drug him), Cobb fell asleep on the plane and dreamed the whole thing. All the other characters in the dream were just random people sitting in 1st class with Cobb, and Fischer became the focal point because Cobb was thinking about Fischer's father's death and his own wife's death when he fell asleep. We learn about the circumstances of Mal's death in the dream and about his love for her, and his guilt at not having been able to save her. She suffered from a mental illness, and even though Cobb taken her to see three psychiatrists who said that nothing was wrong with her, she ended up trashing their hotel room on their anniversary and threw herself off a building after talking some babble about getting on a train. It was the worst moment of his life, and her last words about the train are what are stuck in his head forever. Cobb's whole struggle with Mal is about fighting between staying asleep and being with her in a dream or waking up and having her gone.

Cobb wakes up at the end of the flight, everyone in first class goes their separate ways (Eames isn't even looking at Cobb at the end, he's just some guy waiting for his bags). Cobb passes through immigration without a hitch and Cobb goes home and his kids are there, everything is normal. Grandpa picks him up at the airport and was watching the kids while Cobb was away because Cobb is a widower.

The top? It was just a keepsake that happened to be in his pocket which is why he spins it and casually walks away.

That's it! Simple.

The "complex" version that everyone is arguing about and trying to figure out is that people are trying to make sense of the dream. Now, don't get me wrong, the dream and story in it are totally amazing and I love it, because I love action movies and suspense movies, but ultimately the only 2 "main character" are Cobb and Mal.

The only thing I can say is try my version. Go back and watch the movie again in light of what you just read and see if it doesn't kick the movie up to a whole new level.

Christopher Nolan deserves the Oscar for best picture. Period.

Posts: 19
Joined: June 2010
lsc9x wrote:
Cilogy wrote:You guys are ridiculous.

Why are you obsessing? Is it rewarding you any value? I mean, hey :roll:, if it is then I'd like to join too.
Actually there is. Do you want to think that Inception is a good movie or a great one? Do you care about having emotions about a film? Or about the characters in it?

To me, the best movies are the ones that make you FEEL something. Sadness, happiness, love, etc. If a movie can make you cry at the end because it was so damn good (like "Saving Private Ryan" did for me) then you know it's really, really good.

I knew that Inception was a great movie and well done, but I personally really wanted to know EXACTLY what the movie was about (and a lot of it was unclear on the first viewing) and the biggest thing that kept bugging me is that no matter how I put the pieces together it just didn't completely make sense to me. Something about Mal kept nagging at me as well as some of the concepts people were coming up with. Something was telling me that there was more to this story than trying to break into Fishcer's mind, and I think I have finally "got it".

The reward is that when you realize that it's a LOVE story about a regular dude (Cobb) who's wife (Mal) killed herself, it becomes an emotional movie, and not just a mental one.

When that idea hit me, and I realized that this was really a love story, and that the entire dream heist took place in Cobb's head, then it really made me care about Cobb a whole lot more and it made the ending a really happy one instead of an ambiguous one.

The real story is absurdly simple: Cobb is just a businessman coming home from a trip who wants to get home to see his kids. After buying Robert Fischer Jr a drink to toast Robert's late father (out of sympathy, not to drug him), Cobb fell asleep on the plane and dreamed the whole thing. All the other characters in the dream were just random people sitting in 1st class with Cobb, and Fischer became the focal point because Cobb was thinking about Fischer's father's death and his own wife's death when he fell asleep. We learn about the circumstances of Mal's death in the dream and about his love for her, and his guilt at not having been able to save her. She suffered from a mental illness, and even though Cobb taken her to see three psychiatrists who said that nothing was wrong with her, she ended up trashing their hotel room on their anniversary and threw herself off a building after talking some babble about getting on a train. It was the worst moment of his life, and her last words about the train are what are stuck in his head forever. Cobb's whole struggle with Mal is about fighting between staying asleep and being with her in a dream or waking up and having her gone.

Cobb wakes up at the end of the flight, everyone in first class goes their separate ways (Eames isn't even looking at Cobb at the end, he's just some guy waiting for his bags). Cobb passes through immigration without a hitch and Cobb goes home and his kids are there, everything is normal. Grandpa picks him up at the airport and was watching the kids while Cobb was away because Cobb is a widower.

The top? It was just a keepsake that happened to be in his pocket which is why he spins it and casually walks away.

That's it! Simple.

The "complex" version that everyone is arguing about and trying to figure out is that people are trying to make sense of the dream. Now, don't get me wrong, the dream and story in it are totally amazing and I love it, because I love action movies and suspense movies, but ultimately the only 2 "main character" are Cobb and Mal.

The only thing I can say is try my version. Go back and watch the movie again in light of what you just read and see if it doesn't kick the movie up to a whole new level.

Christopher Nolan deserves the Oscar for best picture. Period.
So why does Cobb Drug him??? and what about everything up to the plane trip?

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