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This 2010 contemporary sci-fi actioner follows Dom Cobb and his subconscious security team around the globe and into the intimate and infinite world of dreams.

Cobb's elevator of regret...

Posts: 2
Hello everyone! I'm new here, but have been reading through the posts for a while. Forgive me if this has been mentioned elsewhere, but I've not been able to find it.

Could that scene on the beach with Mal and the children (witnessed by Ariadne and Cobb from the elevator), have taken place in limbo? Other than that beach scene and the memory where Cobb is arguing with Mal about the fact that they are in reality, the kids are always in the same clothes (except the end of the film, of course). And I should point out that the clothes in the beach scene and that other scene where Mal and Cobb argue, are very similar.

I always assumed the beach scene was a memory of Cobb's of a particularly fond holiday or something, but Cobb does say that these are moments he regrets - memories he has to change. Why should he regret that moment? Unless he and Mal decided to project their children with them in limbo. Surely they would've yearned for their children while spending all that time down there? Is Cobb's guilt even more profound than we originally thought? Because he allowed himself to remain in limbo all that time with his projected children when his actual, real children were right there with him in reality, and then in the whole Mal/Inception fiasco, he ends up abandoning them for real?

Is this news to anyone? Or did you all assume they projected the children in limbo with them? Thoughts?
Posts: 4041
Iv also noticed that the beach scene looks insanely similar to the scene were Cobb and Mal sits on the beach and builds sandcastles in the limbo. Its a very interesting detail.
Posts: 154
I took that scene on the beach to maybe not be a specific memory/moment, but rather a blending of his leaving his children behind with their backs to him.
Posts: 4041
billh777 wrote:I took that scene on the beach to maybe not be a specific memory/moment, but rather a blending of his leaving his children behind with their backs to him.

No, the scene where he leaves his children without seeing their faces takes place in their house/garden. Its not the beach scene.
Posts: 154
Jonas Agersø wrote:
billh777 wrote:I took that scene on the beach to maybe not be a specific memory/moment, but rather a blending of his leaving his children behind with their backs to him.

No, the scene where he leaves his children without seeing their faces takes place in their house/garden. Its not the beach scene.

Yeah I know that :) That was my point: The scene where Ariadne and Cobb are in his elevator and they see Mal and the kids on the beach, looked to me like a blending of various memories. The kids were in very similar position as when he left the kids at the house. without seeing their faces.
Posts: 123
I took that scene on the beach to maybe not be a specific memory/moment, but rather a blending of his leaving his children behind with their backs to him.


I understood that Dom was saying that he 'can't' or won't look at their faces because he was afraid that it would make him want to stay in the dream. Only, why does looking at his wife not affect him in the same way? If he always knows that Mal is dead, why would he dream of her, talk and react to her? Was it just to show Dom's state of mind?

I liked the elevator full of dreams better than the dream within a dream part. But all Ari had to do was get in and push a button. Why couldn't they just get into Fischer's dream and get in an elevator? Wouldn't his father be in his basement?
Posts: 1
author wrote: I understood that Dom was saying that he 'can't' or won't look at their faces because he was afraid that it would make him want to stay in the dream. Only, why does looking at his wife not affect him in the same way? If he always knows that Mal is dead, why would he dream of her, talk and react to her?


She is a projection so she just shows up. He dreams of her because he still loves her and that is the only way he can dream anymore. It is mentioned that he does not believe in only one reality.
As the old man in Mombassa puts it, referring to the opium den of dreamers in Yusuf’s basement: “They come here to be woken up. Their dream has become their reality. Who are you to say otherwise?” http://www.vulture.com/2010/07/inception_theory.html


author wrote:I liked the elevator full of dreams better than the dream within a dream part. But all Ari had to do was get in and push a button. Why couldn't they just get into Fischer's dream and get in an elevator? Wouldn't his father be in his basement?


The reason they can't just go into an elevator in Fischer's dream is because Dom built the elevator to house the memories. Also Dom is back in reality at the end. You can see it in the kids clothing specifically the daughters under shirt, also a wobbling top always falls.
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