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Vader182 wrote:Some much needed perspective in this thread:

-Many movies have a totally different feeling inside a movie theater. 2001: A Space Odyssey, a movie I'd seen a dozen times, felt completely new in 70mm. Sunset Boulevard, Blue Velvet, Tarkovsky, etc, these are movies that have a sense of visual and emotional scale you simply can't get at home. In contrast, Fincher has stated he frames and edits his films to be suited for home theaters since he knows that's where most will discover his movies.

-Moreover, many movies capture a cultural zeitgeist that's no longer there. That doesn't "invalidate" your feelings about a movie at the time, and it doesn't mean you 'got it wrong." It just means the context changed. IE how a movie 'ages.' While I hope Zero Dark Thirty will be the artful historical document for our era that All the President's Men was for the 70s, I'm positive that movie made so much more resonance with audiences in 76 and 77 than it does for me today.

-I think it's important to preserve and respect the way movies make you feel at the time in a cinema. It speaks to a certain kind of power movies have in a venue and context that's often not repeatable. That makes those experiences more special and interesting, not something to 'reverse.'


-Vader
fair points

But like I fucking hated Drive until I saw it the second time and reassessed. Conversely, I thought Man of Steel was amazing and profound in the theater until I revisited it.

So, I have also matured (lol) or my tastes and opinions have changed over time, and perhaps it's a similar case with others.

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I'm really stubborn when it comes to this sort of things. Like I rarely change my ratings after the initial viewing and if I do it usually won't be by much. I gave Prometheus, 8.7 and Man of Steel, 8.3 in my first viewings and they are now at 8.7 and 7.9 respectively. Granted I don't watch these films in theaters, so that might have to do with it, but honestly I think the biggest factor in why people drastically change their views over the years is the outside noise.

It might be presumptuous of me, but I think in plenty of cases, people enjoy these films initially, but after hearing about all the backlash over and over, they start to feel more and more guilty for liking them, and in their subsequent viewings, they tend to be more critical and pay more attention to the elements, that have been the subject of criticism. And considering the fact, that the film has lost the element of surprise and freshness in the segments that they really liked, there is not much to overwhelm these now blown up issues that felt much smaller the first time round. This is something I really try to avoid whenever I can help it, perhaps to a fault.£

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Location: somewhere in northern italy
No, I think the hype around the film and your own hype play a big role in your perception of the film at first. I don't think it's necessarily about the internet raving or criticizing after you've seen the film that plays with your reception of it. I mean, you might look at it more precisely but I don't believe it's all about the hype/hate you hear. I mean, you can make up your own mind can't you.

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Location: Poland
I think this thread should be permanently attached at the top of the entertainment section and updated with all Nolan films we've done this for. So far there's only Dunkirk.

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Joined: February 2011
I have retired from this. You like to do it, go ahead.£

Posts: 26016
Joined: February 2010
Location: Tejas
where's that famous Persian resilience?

Posts: 11791
Joined: February 2011
Cilogy wrote:
April 2nd, 2019, 9:52 pm
where's that famous Persian resilience?
Age has caught up with me I guess.£

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