HBO's Game of Thrones

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So for those of us trying to come to terms with certain character assassinations - I think that's the bargaining stage - I found a couple of articles which try to put a positive spin on Dany's decision to burn KL. The idea is that it was not a moment of madness as found in her Targaryen gene, or mere cruelty which Dany has sometimes partook in (although some of those can also be justified) but rather an act of stunning rationality which fit in with the world of Ice and Fire, and the medieval times as a whole. And even for those saying it still goes against her character, let's not forget that Dany has a bit of megalomania where she really wants to help people, but she has to be in charge. And since she knows she can't get the love in Westeros, or that people love Jon more, her only recourse is fear. So in her view, killing tens of thousands now to make the lives of millions better is justified. And this is not only grasping at straws since it is all there in the episode. The issue is whether the creators will also try to undercut themselves by framing it later as mere madness, or how other characters will perceive it. I am strangely optimistic about the finale.

Links:
https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/gam ... the-bells/

and here:
https://slate.com/culture/2019/05/battl ... ctics.html

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She mentioned to Tyrion that when she freed Mereen, the citizens helped overthrow the city and the citizens of King's Landing have had the chance to do the same and haven't.
Maybe in her fragile state the helped justified to herself that they deserved their fate.

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radewart wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 3:37 pm
She mentioned to Tyrion that when she freed Mereen, the citizens helped overthrow the city and the citizens of King's Landing have had the chance to do the same and haven't.
Maybe in her fragile state the helped justified to herself that they deserved their fate.
Maybe, but I think her decision had less to do with the citizens of KL themselves, and more with the other houses of Westeros. Those who may have the means to rally behind Jon to put him on the throne, or merely try to undermine her authority.

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Dany does what she does
as she grapples with the reality she will be seen as the unloved, foreign ruler she's been accused of for years. So without love, or support, she does the only thing she can: force the people of Westeros to submit to her out of fear they become "the next King's Landing."

It is both mad and logical.
the Spencer Kornhaber section of this article is eloquent to the point: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainme ... ew/589297/


-Vader

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That Atlantic article really gets it, and also makes great point regarding the arcs of other characters. Still though, I have to question whether our eagerness to label Daenerys' decision partly mad, or at least aided by the madness that manifests in some Targaryens, is burdening her with too much Targaryen baggage? Here she just performed the most logical act any character has made in ages in this show. And even if you scour her history, there are no signs of Daenerys being irrational. Or does "madness" maybe refer to a certain brutality, or ruthlessness, which even while logical goes beyond the imagination of most of us? And if so, why do we have a tinge of admiration for Tywin Lannister?

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Supposing Daenerys will likely try to kill Sansa, could we have a fight between Brienne and Grey Worm?

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Demoph wrote:
May 15th, 2019, 4:49 am
Supposing Daenerys will likely try to kill Sansa, could we have a fight between Brienne and Grey Worm?
Just expect the most disappointing outcome and you should be fine.

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Vader182 wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 3:48 pm
Dany does what she does
as she grapples with the reality she will be seen as the unloved, foreign ruler she's been accused of for years. So without love, or support, she does the only thing she can: force the people of Westeros to submit to her out of fear they become "the next King's Landing."

It is both mad and logical.
the Spencer Kornhaber section of this article is eloquent to the point: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainme ... ew/589297/


-Vader
Can't wait to see how this comes to a conclusion in the final episode.
I mean, assuming there won't be a significant time-jump; Daenerys' reign could turn out to be even shorter than Cersei's lol

I assume the third twist has something to do with Bran again, whatever it is.

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Cilogy wrote:
May 13th, 2019, 10:22 am
seems people just like to be outraged

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