Best Films of the Decade (2010-2019)

All non-Nolan related film, tv, and streaming discussions.
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Joined: July 2012
Vader182 wrote:By the way, most people who know a lot about movies classify visual storytelling as the peak of cinematic art.

-Vader
Yes I know, I don't mind the notion of "show don't tell" (something I know Nolan is oft criticized of not abiding by) and there's nothing wrong with visual storytelling, but it should clearly convey what we are not being told. The opening scene of Rear Window is an excellent example of proper visual storytelling.
mchekhov 2: Chek Harder wrote:
lcbaseball22 wrote: Umm, I'm referring to something completely different than simply the progression from silent to talking pictures. Color features, Digital, IMAX, 3D, etc
so the only difference you can spot between that short and modern films is that it's silent and black & white?
Admittedly I didn't watch more than a few moments. I'm sure that there are some other superficial differences from now as the craft has grown but much of it is probably to do with the nature of silent films and how they were acted out in order to express what spoken words could not at the time.

lcbaseball22 wrote: Admittedly I didn't watch more than a few moments. I'm sure that there are some other superficial differences from now as the craft has grown but much of it is probably to do with the nature of silent films and how they were acted out in order to express what spoken words could not at the time.
my point was that film's visual language was in it's early stages of development. fer example every scene holds on a single master shot, not cause they liked that look but because no one had considered using other shot sizes at that time (same goes for the theatrical performances you mentioned). we take these things for granted now but every development was at one point considered radical or "artsy", and had to be pioneered by an "artsy" film

not saying you gotta like artsy shit but it's lame to be against something just cause it tries to achieve things in a new way

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Location: Poland
mchekhov 2: Chek Harder wrote:
lcbaseball22 wrote: Admittedly I didn't watch more than a few moments. I'm sure that there are some other superficial differences from now as the craft has grown but much of it is probably to do with the nature of silent films and how they were acted out in order to express what spoken words could not at the time.
my point was that film's visual language was in it's early stages of development. fer example every scene holds on a single master shot, not cause they liked that look but because no one had considered using other shot sizes at that time (same goes for the theatrical performances you mentioned). we take these things for granted now but every development was at one point considered radical or "artsy", and had to be pioneered by an "artsy" film

not saying you gotta like artsy shit but it's lame to be against something just cause it tries to achieve things in a new way
I couldn't have said it better myself

Posts: 933
Joined: July 2012
The Cabin in the Woods (2012)

What the **** did I just watch and how can anyone consider this a good film? :eh: I understood that this was supposed to be some sort of clever satire of horror films but aside from a few suspenseful scenes it was nothing more than an excessively gory monstrous bore with a preposterous plot. Like they ripped off 'The Hunger Games' control room for the purpose of ritualistic sacrifices to appease ancient gods? :crazy:

Who came up with this crap? It's not even a clever twist, it's random senseless out of left field bull****

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Joined: April 2013
It's actually pretty basic satire of the conventions of the horror genre. Smart enough, funny, and delivers scares to become not only a good horror movie, but also one that destroys it's cliches while still being fun and an homage to the entire genre.

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Joined: January 2013
I liked Cabin In the Woods a lot!

Very funny movie, great characters, and it just get's crazier and crazier. I also appreciate that it had some legitimately intense/scary moments, while being hilarious.

Come on, the elevator scene? Tell me you LOVED the elevator scene?!

And "I'm still on speaker phone aren't I?"

Posts: 19
Joined: November 2014
I probably forgot some


No Order

Drive
Jagten
Shame
Wolf Wall Street
NightCrawler
WhipLash
BLind
GOne Girl
Grand Budapest Hotel
Boyhood
Bidman
Inception
Interstellar
Tree Of Life
Social Network
A Separation
The Past
Moonrise Kingdom
Take Shelter
Mud
Her
The Dark Night
Django
SnowPiercer
Upstream color
Enemy
Prisoners
The ROver
Ida
Leviathan

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Joined: November 2011
Location: North Carolina
Figured it may be an appropriate time to revisit this thread, although the title may need to be changed to "Best Films of the Decade 2010-2019); and I just noticed this is in the Interstellar section, instead of Entertainment for some reason.

My list has changed so much since I wrote in this thread years ago :lol:

Posts: 19660
Joined: June 2012
It's going to be fun to make lists once this decade is out/almost out.

Posts: 19660
Joined: June 2012
This is it! 2019 is almost over and done and we're entering a new decade hopefully full of many wonderful things. In this particular case, films.

So, let's take a look at this past decade. What films are your favorites? Is it even possible to make a worthy top ten if not top twenty? What films made such an impact on you it feels as if they were released yesterday while it may actually be a couple of years?
What directors kept going strong, who bounced back and what made their film one of your best of this decade?

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