The Dark Knight is 10 Years Old(ish) Today

All non-Nolan related entertainment discussion. Join the fun!
Posts: 25236
Joined: June 2011
Never saw this in theaters and it makes me sad every time I think about it. I remember re-watching the trailer literally hundreds of times until I could memorize it. Not exaggerating, but the first time I watched it, it changed the way I thought about art.

Posts: 3970
Joined: January 2012
Saw this film 7 times in theatres in 2008. No regrets.

Posts: 163
Joined: May 2016
shit was lit

Posts: 1406
Joined: July 2012
TIL that most members on NF were babies in 2008

Posts: 41843
Joined: May 2010
m4st4 wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 2:17 pm
DREAMER wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 1:15 pm
m4st4 wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 3:03 am
Batman Forever was my first Batman in cinema but this is different, got my first tatt because of it two years later and I’ve seen it 28-30 times since. I know the movie so well that I haven’t seen it for a good while just to make it feel fresh again in the near future.
*snap*

Loved that film :lol: .Not sure what my opinion of it now would be though.Heck,maybe nostalgia would kick in and I will love it all over again. Unluckily.
I still like it. Nostalgia, production design, Carrey, my kid chrush Kidman etc. It led to a trash fest that is B&R, which led to Begins, which led to TDK... so it’s all connected. ;)
It’s like poetry it rhymes.

Posts: 47
Joined: September 2013
Remember it like yesterday being so hyped while on the way to the movie theater. My only regret is that at this point I didn't know of Imax and missed watching it there. I have since watched every other of Nolan's film in Imax. The Dark Knight is a masterpiece and is my favorite film.

Posts: 2416
Joined: January 2015
Location: Poland
darthnazgul wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 1:05 pm
m4st4 wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 3:03 am
Batman Forever was my first Batman in cinema but this is different, got my first tatt because of it two years later and I’ve seen it 28-30 times since. I know the movie so well that I haven’t seen it for a good while just to make it feel fresh again in the near future.
My first Batman in cinema was Batman & Robin. :blank:
Batman Returns was mine. Until I saw Batman Forever it was my favorite Batman flick out of the two Burton flicks because of this. Now I'd even put it under the 66 version... and Forever even below Batman & Robin.

But my feelings towards The Dark Knight haven't changed one bit. In order to talk about it, I'd need to mention Batman Begins first, though. I saw it in the cinema in 2005 when I was already an adult for the first time watching a bat flick and fittingly enough I got an adult approach towards the character and his mythology, which absolutely blew me away with its cinematography, acting, plot, twists and grittiness, which by now, to be honest, is overused and misunderstood in terms of Nolan’s films. He said this about the first movie: “We’re able to do what I always wanted to do, which was to have a relatively recognizable world were Batman is an extraordinary element.” And these are the words I always had in my mind when I watched his movies – they’re not reality based, they are full of impossible scenarios, with a little of Hollywood and comic book magic, but they are just set in a world that feels true to what we know, in which the events from the film could happen with an additional sense of wonder. It combined the best of both worlds in my opinion and that’s why I gravitated towards this vision instead of others. Batman Begins made me come back to comic books and the superhero genre after many years but it also mesmerized me to the point when I became a huge Chris Nolan fan. The same week that I saw his first Batman movie, I saw Memento (I know I was a little late to the party even by then but bare with me), which before felt like a "pretentious, artsy-fartsy film" from the trailers. How wrong was I! Although I am not the biggest fan of Following, Insomnia and Dunkirk, I again have to thank Batman for introducing me to one of the best directors out there today, one which I might have never known if it wasn’t for BB.

Soooo... three years later came The Dark Knight, the movie which, until its sequel, was the most anticipated movie of my life - it was simply THE movie to look forward to and The Dark Knight did not disappoint, in any way whatsoever. I remember when watching the movie for the first time that it’s not as good of a Batman story as its predecessor but that it's simply a better movie. It still stands true for me, because as much as I loved BB for focusing almost exclusively on the main protagonist, I loved The Dark Knight for highlighting the world of Gotham City. Bruce still gets a great underrated character arc in this but it is undoubtedly the one movie in this series where the villains can really shine. And that’s what’s great about this universe – his villains are as exciting as the hero, they can even make more sense at different stages of the movie and it definitely does not surprise me that someone would gravitate towards the Joker or Two-Face. That is what makes them so much more interesting in the movie, because thanks to those feelings that we, the viewers, have we can relate to the henchmen who would be affiliated with the Joker, who would see a point to his madness. The boundaries between the hero and the villain are blurred even more in the already classic interrogation scene, where through the eyes of Batman we see that, for a split second, even he can understand the man “ahead of the curve”. As much as the first movie was a test of Bruce Wayne in terms of being a legend and a symbol, the sequel was a test of his endurance, both physical and mental, and there was no better examiner than the Joker. I try not to make it a secret that The Dark Knight is my favorite movie of all-time. It has its faults, sure. Hell, sometimes I don't even think of it as Nolan's best, as I consider Interstellar his true masterpiece. If it wasn’t for the character that I always loved, The Dark Knight would maybe, just maybe, be a perfect 10 (which still is a huge accomplishment in my eyes as there are very few films I'd give that high of a praise). But! Since it is Batman, it gets the extra points and I’m not ashamed to say it. The lone fact that The Dark Knight was such an amazing movie about my favorite fictional universe I think more than justifies the movie’s position in my personal rankings.

Batfan175 wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 3:28 pm
Saw this film 7 times in theatres in 2008. No regrets.
Same for me, but I was working in a cinema during summer at college so I didn't have to pay for any of it. I have payed to see it in an old-school theater I wasn't working in, though. Great experience, one of the best cinematic experiences I've ever had.
1. Interstellar in IMAX
2. The Force Awakens in IMAX
3. The Dark Knight in a classic theater
4. Terminator 2 - my first R-rated movie
5. Avatar in 3D

Posts: 19594
Joined: June 2011
Location: The Ashes of Gotham
It was the day after my 11th birthday, and it was the day before I would fly overseas to, coincidentally, Hong Kong (as well as England and other countries around Europe). I stayed over at my cousin's place, and then the next morning he took me and my 6 year old brother to see the movie. It is one of those movies I wish I could unsee just so I can experience seeing it for the first time again. Even as an 11 year old, I felt the scale of the story, the stakes of the conflict, and the mastery of the filmmaking.

Watching Heath Ledger as The Joker was like watching a tight-rope walker performing without a safety-net; dangerous yet completely mesmerising. It is a performance that has stayed with me, so much so the costume I chose to dress up as for my school semi-formal (it was a little bit different at our school) was Ledger's Joker.

Image

It is the movie I have rewatched more than any other movie, it is a movie that burst open my love for the craft of filmmaking, and it is a movie that we can finally say, 10 years later, is a cinematic classic.

User avatar
Ace
Posts: 1078
Joined: November 2012
Michael Jai White Explains Gambol's Bizarre Death Scene in 'The Dark Knight'
Nolan offered White the role of Gambol — the no-nonsense gangster who signed his own death warrant when he tried to tangle with The Joker, brought to life by Ledger in an Oscar-winning performance.

While never a principal role, Gambol was bigger in the script and during production, White says.

"It was the kind of thing where they had deeper intentions for Gambol; it was a character who was written for future use, I think," he says. "There were other plans to do stuff with that character and some things that were cut out. I think it's because of unfortunately losing Heath Ledger."

Calling it a matter of "tying up loose ends," White says he got why Nolan made the choice in postproduction.

It turns out, though, Gambol was not written to die, just to get a Glasgow smile of his own, White explains.

"I think that people can tell by the strange cut that I never shot a death scene," White says. "The character wasn't supposed to be gone. That is something that happened in editing later."

He continues, "You don't see mistakes in a movie of that magnitude. When you see something that is somewhat a mistake or is not clarified, there is something behind that."

Being that I have been on both sides of the camera, I understood," White says. "I was as surprised as anybody. The next few moments after Gambol hit the ground, I was in a state of confusion, like 'What the hell happened? I guess I am not coming back.' But, I have a producer's and director's mind-set, so I was able to look at it and think, 'I guess they must have wanted to go this way.'"
More of the interview at the link-https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat- ... ne-1125924

Posts: 2416
Joined: January 2015
Location: Poland
Ace wrote:
July 16th, 2018, 11:02 am
Michael Jai White Explains Gambol's Bizarre Death Scene in 'The Dark Knight'
Nolan offered White the role of Gambol — the no-nonsense gangster who signed his own death warrant when he tried to tangle with The Joker, brought to life by Ledger in an Oscar-winning performance.

While never a principal role, Gambol was bigger in the script and during production, White says.

"It was the kind of thing where they had deeper intentions for Gambol; it was a character who was written for future use, I think," he says. "There were other plans to do stuff with that character and some things that were cut out. I think it's because of unfortunately losing Heath Ledger."

Calling it a matter of "tying up loose ends," White says he got why Nolan made the choice in postproduction.

It turns out, though, Gambol was not written to die, just to get a Glasgow smile of his own, White explains.

"I think that people can tell by the strange cut that I never shot a death scene," White says. "The character wasn't supposed to be gone. That is something that happened in editing later."

He continues, "You don't see mistakes in a movie of that magnitude. When you see something that is somewhat a mistake or is not clarified, there is something behind that."

Being that I have been on both sides of the camera, I understood," White says. "I was as surprised as anybody. The next few moments after Gambol hit the ground, I was in a state of confusion, like 'What the hell happened? I guess I am not coming back.' But, I have a producer's and director's mind-set, so I was able to look at it and think, 'I guess they must have wanted to go this way.'"
More of the interview at the link-https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat- ... ne-1125924
I'm pretty sure he died in the original script

Post Reply