Us (2019)

All non-Nolan related film, tv, and streaming discussions.
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I'm mad I won't get to watch this for another week. Twitter is obsessed with the movie already, and I'm scared I'm going to get spoiled quite easily.

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About to see this

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Location: The White City
If US seems messy, it is almost certainly by design. Peele rejects the unified cohesion of GET OUT. Instead, US prickles and pokes, and denies the comfort of thinkpiece-ready messaging. It is more demanding, confrontational, & yet, succeeds as a chilling & visceral horror movie.

Peele's talent is a treasury of riches. He is the uncommon talent that knows when to deploy a muscular tracking shot and when to keep the camera static. When music should veer on operatic and when to let sound design dominate. Most of all, he knows the power of Lupita Nyong'o.

Peele detonates themes of duality, darwin, agency, class and gender, and he uses them as sociopolitical shrapnel. US is hard to talk about without spoilers, but the structure is implicitly disorienting, and the type of movie that demands to be seen more than once. I can't wait.


-Vader

actual spoilers

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i give this film a them out of 10

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Joined: June 2011
Mixed on this. The plot itself makes little sense and only continues to do so with every twist and turn it throws at the audience. The film itself is crafted exceptionally though, and Peele is utilizing everything he can at his disposal. His directing, shot composition, editing, etc. is all on point.

But as much as I was wanting to love it, I couldn't justify some of the oddball choices the movie makes that, unlike what Vader is saying, does not feel purposeful to me. Multiple families were literally arguing about core plot points of the film over who understood it correctly, and I honestly didn't know who was right. The film brings you more questions than answers, which would be fine if the questions themselves even lined up.

Lupita is a monumental force of nature in this, and the score is brilliantly composed and used.
Final twist is terrible though.
Probably a 6.5 or a 7/10 from me if I had to rate it. Could improve on multiple viewings, but I'm not sure.

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Location: The White City
bacon, the
twist is the entire point of the movie and is set up in about 5 different ways from the opening scenes. The sociopolitical metaphor of the whole thing rests entirely on the final reveal.

Also:

"I just want her to talk again."

"I just want my daughter back"

"I have a hard time just talking"

-Vader

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lol dude
I got that, but the power of the subtext doesn't make the twist itself fit well with the actual events of the narrative. It was a twist I saw coming a mile away from when the movie started and when the exposition scene happened I was like "oh they're not going with it. Sweet!" and then they did it.

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Location: The White City
ah i feel you.
how doesn't it fit?
-Vader

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Joined: June 2011
Setting metaphor and subtext aside:
Certain aspects try really hard to make the twist work. Adelaide's primal screams and sighs when she kills her doppelganger, along with her hints about how she struggles speaking. But I find it extremely odd that Adelaide (the one alive at the end of the film) seems to have no memory of her origin until the plot decides to let her have the revelation. Why has she forgotten throughout all of this and is just now remembering it when she's been going through way more traumatic experiences throughout the runtime of the film? Or has she not forgotten at all? That option might be even more problematic. Not to mention her doppelganger not bringing this up in the slightest. I understand this version of her has gone insane, but I'm not sure how that affects the way she speaks to the extent it obviously does and I'm not sure how it affects her memories because she appears to have no recollection of being the real Adelaide. EDIT: Just read somewhere that the original Adelaide had her throat crushed? Was this explicitly shown and how did I miss that if it was?

This muddied final twist is also worsened by just how far-fetched the entire clone concept is. The final image of the reds holding hands is powerful, and dare-I-say iconic, but the helicopters in the sky reinforce just how pointless this gesture is. All of the reds will most likely be taken down easily as soon as they finish their public display. Why did they go through all this effort to just do...this? Was it ever explained how any of them were even able to break through their fixed patterns of behavior in the first place? They all seemed to be completely powerless in the flashbacks. How did Adelaide's doppelganger organize the revolution? There's tons of variables glossed over. It's not the point of the film but there are tons of things that don't line up logically. It's a great Twilight Zone episode, but it hurts the film as a whole imo.
The first two thirds were near pitch-perfect only to crumble its concepts under its own ambition, something I'm surprised happened considering Peele's previous navigation of pitfalls. He provides lots of ideas to think about but the film could have been so much stronger if the material that the ideas come from was more solid.

I'm fully aware I'm in the minority on this.

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