Black Panther (2018)

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Ruth wrote:
February 23rd, 2018, 6:53 am
To be honest, at first I hated him. Part of me is because I'm just #teammaincast lol but also because I knew he was supposed to be more than that in the film, yet had a very hard time sympathizing with him after he killed his lover with no consideration whatsoever. I also don't necessarily agree with the idea that he was never out there to "enrich himself" (paraphrasing someone's words), because on top of the genuine conflict there was, he seemed genuinely very power hungry as an individual.


Hey Auntie! :P

Ruth wrote:
February 23rd, 2018, 6:53 am
Besides, W'kabi does mention, that (paraphrasing, again) "soon the world will be divided between conquerors and the conquered" and that he'd rather be among the first. Which, obviously, stems from fear and need to protect oneself, but at the same time I feel like it does imply Killmonger and those close to him may have had intentions that weren't just fighting for Wakanda and his people's equality or were at the very least oblivious of how much of a double edged sword his actions would've been and the potential damage that would've ensued to Wakanda (and pretty much everybody else). He also orders to burn the Heart Shaped Herb/Flower, and no matter how I look at it, it's a selfish move - he wants to establish himself as the sole ruler of Wakanda and doesn't want anyone else to come after him.

The burning of the herbs wasn’t a selfish act. That had everything to do with Killmonger disdain for Wakanda's culture. When Killmonger becomes king and visits the ancestral realm, he enters his small childhood apartment in Oakland, not Wakanda like T’Challa. Here, we witness the break down of history and lineage. Killmonger grew up listening to stories of Wakanda, of their sunrise, but his father never got to return to Wakanda. Ultimately, both became lost souls, trapped outside their homeland. It speaks to the experience of being an African-American, the separation that comes from being away from your ancestor’s homeland. Wakandans isolationist mentality is what failed Killmonger. They rejected him. It metaphorically expresses the feeling of betrayal that Africans never fought for black people when they got enslaved/mistreated by the world. Killmonger represents that bitterness. His cultural isolation negatively affected how Wakanda's tradition, elders and ancestors are treated, even blatantly disrespect it. He made it all the way to Wakanda but never once did he stop to appreciate its beauty, he was consumed with rage. His final line, “Bury me at sea where my ancestors jumped the ships. They knew death was better than life in bondage” shows that he connected with the African diaspora till the very end not with his father's homeland, even after T’Challa brings him to watch the sunset. The struggle to identify with Wakanda is the reason why he didn’t care for Wakanda’s future.
Ruth wrote:
February 23rd, 2018, 6:53 am
But I feel like it wouldn't have hurt to spend some more time with his character.
I don't know, I feel Killmonger is already layered, I don’t know what more needs be to added. Coogler builds on real life experiences rather than showing them. In the ancestral realm, we see that at Killmonger’s core he had to turn his sadness into anger because he was never given space for perceived weakness. When his father asks, “No tears for me?” He responds with everyone dies. Its not necessary to see him growing up in violence. We can assume his childhood was taken from him and he had to grow up and leave the sentiment behind him. His pain and rage was real, he was determined to correct deep political injustice.
Agree with everything else. Also thank you for being one of the few on here to actually bother going into specifics.

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^Interesting. It's something I'd thought of after submitting my initial post lol.
It's pretty freaking strong man, idk. I didn't connect it with the burning herbs thing, but it did dawn upon me how Killmonger never aligned with Wakandans enough because of the strong sense betrayal he felt, took upon himself to speak up for the oppressed, and saw the African diaspora from the slave trade as more of his actual identity. He's denied Wakanda as his actual home, despite actually being one of their own, but to the older generations that's not enough. Just like African Americans are torn between feeling alien and unwelcome in a forced "home" they've never chosen and having their actual homeland and culture torn away from them. I agree with you.
Sure, I don't think using his childhood to further "build" him was necessary. But I would've loved to see more his then "current" inner state of being, to contrast the attitude he was putting on in front of others. Like, maybe it's not really necessary, but it would've been cool, I guess?
As someone who's neither African, nor American, I'm super curious about stuff like this, but I'm also expecting a lot of things to fly over my head so to speak, due to difference of experiences. So sorry if I sound misinformed on some things haha.

lupita just not being into him would have been soooo much better omg

but ya all the blockbuster tropes were boring all the unique stuff was fun and refreshing

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Still haven't seen this.

Can only afford one film the next two weeks, and it has to be Shape of Water.

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Location: Canada
Ruth wrote:
February 23rd, 2018, 7:28 pm
^Interesting. It's something I'd thought of after submitting my initial post lol.
It's pretty freaking strong man, idk. I didn't connect it with the burning herbs thing, but it did dawn upon me how Killmonger never aligned with Wakandans enough because of the strong sense betrayal he felt, took upon himself to speak up for the oppressed, and saw the African diaspora from the slave trade as more of his actual identity. He's denied Wakanda as his actual home, despite actually being one of their own, but to the older generations that's not enough. Just like African Americans are torn between feeling alien and unwelcome in a forced "home" they've never chosen and having their actual homeland and culture torn away from them. I agree with you.
Sure, I don't think using his childhood to further "build" him was necessary. But I would've loved to see more his then "current" inner state of being, to contrast the attitude he was putting on in front of others. Like, maybe it's not really necessary, but it would've been cool, I guess?
As someone who's neither African, nor American, I'm super curious about stuff like this, but I'm also expecting a lot of things to fly over my head so to speak, due to difference of experiences. So sorry if I sound misinformed on some things haha.
You didn’t come off misinformed. I’m learning too. I’ve been blowing up my East African and Nigerian friends group chats about this film, lol. I wasn’t aware of how almost every line and joke was speaking to a part of black culture.

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Sanchez wrote:
February 24th, 2018, 4:31 am
Still haven't seen this.

Can only afford one film the next two weeks, and it has to be Shape of Water.
You'll be thanking yourself for the rest of your life.

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Joined: August 2012
Quell wrote:
February 25th, 2018, 7:09 am
Sanchez wrote:
February 24th, 2018, 4:31 am
Still haven't seen this.

Can only afford one film the next two weeks, and it has to be Shape of Water.
You'll be thanking yourself for the rest of your life.
:roll: :roll:

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NFometer (83%)
Based on the Ratings of 6 Members
Average Score: (8.5/10)





Positive

rjones1325 (9.6/10)
BlairCo (9/10)
cooldude (9/10)
Vader182 (8.7/10)
Batfan175 (7.5/10)





Mixed

m4st4 (6/10)





£

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Loved this. will watch again 9,5/10

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Location: 'Taked baby. Meet at later bar, night or day sometime
Put me as a 7.8/10.

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